American Southern States: 19th-21st Century Paintings



Introduction

This section of the Traditional Fine Arts Organization (TFAO) catalogue Topics in American Art is devoted to the topic "American Southern States: 19th-21st Century Paintings." Articles and essays specific to this topic published in TFAO's Resource Library are listed at the beginning of the section.

Following are links to valuable online resources found outside our website. Links may be to museums' articles about exhibits, plus much more topical information based on our online searches.

Following online resources is information about offline resources including museums, DVDs, and paper-printed books, journals and articles.

 

Articles and essays from Resource Library in chronological order:

2011-2016

2008-2010

2006-2007

2004-2005

2003

2001-2002

2000

1999

1997-1998

 

From other websites:

Betty Bivins Edwards: Retrospective, an exhibit held January 23 - April 26, 2015 at the Museum of Arts and Sciences, Macon. Accessed March, 2015.

Beverly Buchanan: Southern Vernacular, an exhibit held in 2014 at the Museum of Arts and Sciences, Macon. Accessed March, 2015.

Bill Rutherfoord: Allegory of No Region is a 2017 exhibit at the Polk Museum of Art which says: "The reclaimed character Brer Rabbit leads the viewer on an epic journey across three centuries of heroism and trickery, both comic and tragic, ultimately creating historical and contemporary allegories and conundrums that lead to an investigation of the very nature of identity, culture, and history - personal and public, regional and national, high and low." Also see press release https://polkmuseumofart.org/press-content/2017/10/12/bill-rutherfoord-exhibition-opens and artist's website  Accessed 12/17

The Crossroads of Memory: Carroll Cloar and the American South was a 2014-15 exhibit at the Georgia Museum of Art. Accessed August, 2015. Also, an essay by Joshua Fisher, Arkansas Tech University, discusses the exhibit. Accessed 2/17

Fever Within: The Art of Ronald Lockett is a 2016-17 exhibit at the High Museum of Art, which says: "The art of Ronald Lockett (American, 1965-1998) is both deeply connected to his life in the American South and transcendently resonant with broader human experience. In visually arresting works assembled from found materials, Lockett used a symbolic cast of animal avatars to address themes of struggle, survival, and injustice that are powerfully relevant today." See overview and 6 min video by curators. Accessed 10/16

Going Home: Paintings by Anne Goldthwaite (1869-1944) was a 2016 exhibit at Montgomery Museum of Fine Arts, which says: "Painter and printmaker Anne Goldthwaite was a native Montgomerian who spent the majority of her career in New York City. While she resided on East Tenth Street in Manhattan for most of the year, she valued her routine summertime visits to her family back home in Montgomery and the surrounding areas. During these visits she made drawings and paintings that reflected her love of her family home, the townscape, and the culture of the South." Also see Anne Goldthwaite from the Johnson Collection. Accessed 10/16

Is It A True Likeness? is a 2018 exhibit at the TJC Gallery which says: "While both traditional and progressive likenesses were created by Southern artists, such depictions did not necessarily reflect women's realities. In truth, throughout the early twentieth century women in the South largely conformed to established gender roles dictated by the region's conservative values." Accessed 5/18

The WGBH/Boston Forum Network is an audio and video streaming web site dedicated to curating and serving live and on-demand lectures, including a number of videos on Art and Architecture. Partners include a number of museums, colleges, universities and other cultural organizations. See listings of related videos in this catalogue indexed by partner name. High Museum of Art partnered with Forum Network for Voice and Vision in Southern Self-Taught Art with discussion by Susan Crawley, curator, High Museum of Art, Carol Crown, assoc professor, art history, U Memphis, Charles Russell, assoc director, Rutgers Institute and Charles Reagan Wilson, director, Center for Southern Culture. (1 hour, 24 minutes) The High Museum's Susan Crawley, associate curator of folk art, moderates a panel discussion inspired by Carol Crown and Charles Russell's recent publication Sacred and Profane: Voice and Vision in Southern Self-Taught Art. Noted scholars discuss self-taught art in a cultural context. [April 12, 2007]. Accessed August, 2015.

The Johnson Collection website provides biographies of numerous historic Southern artists. Accessed August, 2015.

Paintings of the Eighteenth and Nineteenth Centuries: Overview from the New Georgia Encyclopedia, A project of the Georgia Humanities Council, in partnership with the University of Georgia Press, the University System of Georgia/GALILEO, the Office of the Governor, and the Georgia Department of Technical and Adult Education. Accessed August, 2015.

Prints and Drawings of the Eighteenth and Nineteenth Centuries: Overview from the New Georgia Encyclopedia. Accessed August, 2015.

Romantic Spirits: Nineteenth-century Paintings of the South from the Johnson Collection was a 2015-16 exhibit at the Columbus Museum, which says:"Thirty-eight landscape, history, genre, portrait, and still-life paintings, including works by Thomas Sully, Washington Allston, Charles Bird King, Junius Brutus Stearns, William Dickinson Washington, and Robert Walter Weir, will be on view in this major exhibition on loan from the Johnson Collection." Accessed 10/16

Romantic Spirits: Nineteenth-Century Paintings from the Johnson Collection was a 2014-15 exhibit at the Telfair Museum of Art. Includes online video narrated by Courtney McNeil. Accessed 10/16

Southern Accent: Seeking the American South in Contemporary Art is a 2016-17 exhibit at Nasher Museum of Art, co-organized by Trevor Schoonmaker, Chief Curator and Patsy R. and Raymond D. Nasher Curator of Contemporary Art at the Nasher Museum of Art at Duke University, and Miranda Lash, Curator of Contemporary Art at the Speed Art Museum in Louisville, Kentucky, which travels to the Speed Art Museum in 2017. NMA says: "This unprecedented exhibition addresses and complicates the many realities, fantasies and myths that have long captured the public's imagination about the American South. Presenting a wide range of perspectives, from both within and outside of the region, the exhibition creates a composite portrait of southern identity through the work of 60 artists. The art reflects upon and pulls apart the dynamic nature of the South's social, political and cultural landscape." The mini-site for the exhibit includes images of artworks, a reading list and resources; podcasts and more. Also see a September 24, 2016 review titled "'Southern Accent' Is a Revolutionary Exploded Diagram of Southern Identity in Contemporary Art" by Brian Howe at hyperallergic.com. Accessed 10/16.

 

Books:

The South on Paper, By Estill Curtis Pennington, James C. Kelly. Published by Univ of South Carolina Press, 2000. ISBN 0963283634, 9780963283634. 155 pages. Google Books offers a limited preview of this book.

 

A potential source of Resource Library articles and essays is the North Carolina Arboretum, located in Asheville, North Carolina. The Arboretum features rotating exhibitions at the Baker Exhibit Center.

 

(above: Baker Exhibit Center, North Carolina Arboretum, May, 2015. Photo © John Hazeltine)

 

Return to Topics in American Representational Art

We welcome suggestions for additional content by sending an email to


TFAO catalogues:

Individual pages in each catalogue are continuously amended as TFAO adds content, corrects errors and reorganizes sections for improved readability. Refreshing or reloading pages enables readers to view the latest updates.

Links to sources of information outside of our web site are provided only as referrals for your further consideration. Please use due diligence in judging the quality of information contained in these and all other web sites. Information from linked sources may be inaccurate or out of date. TFAO neither recommends or endorses these referenced organizations. Although TFAO includes links to other web sites, it takes no responsibility for the content or information contained on those other sites, nor exerts any editorial or other control over them. For more information on evaluating web pages see TFAO's General Resources section in Online Resources for Collectors and Students of Art History.


Search Resource Library

Copyright 2018 Traditional Fine Arts Organization, Inc., an Arizona nonprofit corporation. All rights reserved.