John Marin's Watercolors: A Medium for Modernism

January 23 - April 17, 2011



 

Additional images

 

(above: John Marin (American, 1870-1953). Cape Split, Maine, 1941. Watercolor with touches of blotting with graphite and black colored pencil, on light weight (estimated) slightly textured ivory wove paper (top, left and right edges trimmed), laid down on artists' board faced with ivory wove paper, in original frame; 392 x 521 mm; 553 x 732 mm (mount). Olivia Shaler Swan Memorial Collection.)

 

(above: John Marin (American, 1870-1953). Movement: Fifth Avenue, 1912. Watercolor, with blotting and traces of scraping, with traces of graphite, on moderately thick, moderately textured, off-white wove paper; 428 x 348 mm. Alfred Stieglitz Collection.)

 

(above: John Marin (American, 1870-1953). The Pine Tree, Small Point, Maine, 1926. Watercolor with blotting, black pencil, and charcoal on moderately thick, slightly textured, off-white, wove paper (trimmed top edge), in original frame; 441 x 556 mm (max). Alfred Stieglitz Collection.)

 

(above: John Marin (American, 1870-1953). West Forty-Second Street from Ferryboat, 1929. Watercolor with wiping, blotting,and scraping, with black colored pencil, black crayon, and graphite, on moderately thick (estimated) slightly textured, ivory wove paper (all edges trimmed) perimeter mounted to woodpulp board faced with cream wove paper, in original frame; 549 x 663 mm; 583 x 753 mm (secondary support). Alfred Stieglitz Collection.)

 

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