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Elizabeth Enders: Landscape/Language/Line

March 7 - August 23, 2009.

 

Lyman Allyn Art Museum is presenting Elizabeth Enders: Landscape/Language/Line, on view through August 23, 2009. (right: Elizabeth Enders, Fast Food/Bananas, 2002, Watercolor on paper, 11 1/2 x 9 1/4 inches) 

Elizabeth Enders was born and raised in New London, Connecticut so it is a special honor for the Museum to mount the first retrospective of this important contemporary American artist. Five decades of Enders' work will be on view ranging from marine landscapes to large language-based paintings to small, intimate watercolor botanicals.

Elizabeth Enders: Landscape/Language/Line is curated by Charlotta Kotik, Curator Emerita of Contemporary Art at the Brooklyn Museum. Kotik has been praised by the New York Times as "the unofficial but undisputed top talent scout" for artists in New York City. Kotik will present a lecture Elizabeth Enders: The Line Revisited on Thursday, April 2.

Curator Kotik comments on Enders' work: "Lyrical and meditative, Elizabeth Enders heightens our curiosity to learn more about the world around us, to penetrate deeper into the often-concealed magic of simple everyday experiences. The power of Enders' artistic persuasion energizes our perception to see the beauty in the simple willow twig as much as in the magnificence of the ocean."

The exhibition is accompanied by an 80-page exhibition catalogue Elizabeth Enders: Landscape/ Language/Line that features an essay written by Guest Curator Charlotta Kotik, an interview with Elia by Irving Sandler, pre-eminent American Art Historian, and a foreward by Nancy Stula, Director of the Museum.

 

Lecture

Elizabeth Enders: The Line Revisited

Thursday, April 2, 2009 6:00 pm.

Charlotta Kotik, Guest Curator of the exhibition and Curator Emerita of Contemporary Art at the Brooklyn Museum. Kotik has known the artist for some time, making her insights particularly enlightening when visitors view the exhibition and then come to the lecture. Wine and cheese reception at 5:00 pm. Reservations suggested. 860.443.2545 x 112. Fee.

 

(above: Elizabeth Enders, Iris/Peony/Chive II, Day I, 2007, Colored pencil, pencil on paper, 14 x 11 inches)

 

(above: Elizabeth Enders, Atlantic, 1992, Oil on linen, 60 x 60 inches)

 

(above: Elizabeth Enders, Yellow Anemone/Purple Veronica II, Series I, 2003, Watercolor, pencil on paper) 

 

Wall panel texts from the exhibition

 

Introductory panel

"Begin. Begin at the beginning.
As I think about the early signs of loving art, I realize that art was a lifeline.
It provided intensity and purpose, and made it possible to say something --
to communicate with other people."
-- Elizabeth Enders

Elizabeth Enders' early interests were literary. After attending Barnard College in New York, she enrolled at Connecticut College to study creative writing, languages, and playwriting. During this time she began to draw extensively, illustrating her notebooks with whimsical drawings. Much of the page space was accorded to these quick sketches and soon the words themselves started to metamorphose into calligraphic marks of Enders' mysterious alphabet. These were to remain the essential components of the majority of her subsequent works. The artist's early literary interests inform a large portion of her work. Enders sees her paintings as a sort of communication: in order to establish a potential discourse with others, Enders often marks sheets of paper or canvas with mysterious marks of a fictional alphabet. We perceive these as images, but also have tendency to "read" them, acknowledging the presence of a visual poetry which remains an important undercurrent in this artist's oeuvre.

Enders' interest in the principles of abstraction led to the reduction of descriptive details in her work. The 1970's ushered in an unending fascination with the ocean, an element Enders was familiar with since her childhood, spent in coastal New London and in Newburyport, Massachusetts. In these seascapes, the essential parts of a particular site, such as horizon line or a color hue, are acknowledged. It is the elimination of the nonessential detail that transforms Enders' paintings into universal statements about the elusive beauty of the coastal areas.

Enders' most recent work includes small marine paintings and watercolors, numerous botanical drawings, as well as ambitious large oil paintings. Conjuring the subjects that have always interested her -- the abstracted nature imagery, the cryptic messages hidden in the complex arrangement of short energetic marks of various colors, the soft gradation of background hues -- all account for the well-balanced composition Enders aims for. In the diverse artistic universe of today, Enders creates microcosms of her own design. Fusing descriptive tendencies with those of lyrical abstraction, the artist unites opposites in purposeful harmony. Working in a number of genres, she offers us a kaleidoscope of impressions. Lyrical and meditative, the work of Elizabeth Enders energizes our perception to see beauty in the simple blossom as much as in the magnificence of the ocean.

Charlotta Kotik,

Guest Curator

 

Ocean Series

Enders began her exploration of coastal imagery in the l970s. According to the artist, the Atlantic Ocean was a factor in her family's life "from the time we were born." She recalls: "It was so intense and large when we were quite small. It was a huge force [but]. . . there is something comforting about it as well." In Enders' seascapes, the essential parts of a particular site, such as horizon line or a color hue, are acknowledged. However, it is the elimination of the nonessential details that transforms Enders' paintings into universal statements about the elusive beauty of the coastal areas.

In l986 and 1987 Enders painted on the coast of Maine. This experience brought new visual stimuli to her work: the color blue became predominant, corresponding to the richness of variegated blues of the ocean and the seaside atmosphere. In l990 she began to spend part of her summers in Chester, Nova Scotia. Many of the works executed there are her observations from a sailboat when the twists and turns of the craft change the perspective, ushering in unexpected angles and pints of view. In the Nova Scotia series we encounter a number of abstracted landscape motifs based on the keen observation of the coastline. While in the earlier Maine Series the artist almost completely dissociated herself from the visual references to the existing environment, in the works from the Nova Scotia Series one can detect the artist's resolve to capture the local topography, albeit in a flattened, simplified and chromatically altered form. The countless number of oil paintings, watercolors, and gouaches based on Enders' keen, steadfast, and loving observation of the ocean comprises the largest portion of her work. Presently Elizabeth Enders is among the most dedicated and accomplished of the contemporary marine painters.

 

Botanicals

Some of Enders' earliest works were renderings of various plants. Her mother, who liked to spend time arranging flowers, instilled in the young artist a love of this subject. Enders feels that her portrayals of plants and blossoms fall short of their real beauty. "I do not have training to really do a botanical, a proper one, but it really is using the basic look of the flowers and then launching off with some kind of inspiration. . . I find flowers that are interesting. I look at them closely, and make a pencil sketch. I then complete the drawing with colored pencil and watercolor, often adding text or calligraphic marks."

Her botanicals have a literary quality as well. Described in various stages of maturing, in full splendor turning to slight decline, we read the story of the flower sketched in a delicate but affirmative manner. This progression and effect of time, first suggested in 1958 in Black Eyed Susan, is evidenced in the many depictions of flowers in Enders' oeuvre. Elizabeth Enders has distinguished predecessors in Ellsworth Kelly, Nancy Graves, Jim Dine, and Pat Steir, all of whom have expressed their enchantment with the beauty of flowers at some point during their career.

 

New York, September 11, 2001

Enders executed numerous works after the fateful morning of September 11, 2001. In these images, the "writing" is both subject and object, or form and content. For Enders, whose studio was in lower Manhattan, not far from the World Trade Center, the obsessive repeated writing of very common words became a kind of personal art therapy. Enders remembers: "I wrote all the time, performing a ritual, as if obsessive mark making could change the outcome. 'Breakfast.' 'Lunch.' 'Dinner.' 'Silence.' 'Look at Art.' Days of writing, repetition of words about rock bottom needs. It could not change the situation, it could only transform it."

The extensive series began with the poignant words, Look at Art, a phrase that is repeated in tightly organized rows over the width of the paper. The eerie silence that enveloped downtown Manhattan after the tragedy was commemorated in several pieces. In Silence/Saffron from 2002, the word "silence" is written in script ranging from clearly legible to barely decipherable. Silence has always impressed Enders with its mysterious power. She notes: "Silence. . . has volume. It is loud and quiet at the same time and it is full and empty." Although the origin of the series was the unfathomable tragedy of 9/11, there is an almost sensual beauty in these simple renderings of ordinary words. When we first encounter them, we read them for their literal meaning. The new situation de-contextualizes the words, partially obliterating their accustomed significance. Words and/or short phrases take on a new metaphoric meaning, as they become components of the paintings. The inclusion of words in a work of art greatly extends their capacity of meaning.

 

London

From l973 until l977, the Enders family lived in London. Elizabeth rented a studio in Islington and there, she began to work larger than before, purchasing the largest canvases that would fit in a taxi -- 40 x 60 inches. The artist remembers: "First of all it began with the streets, the grey streets making patterns through the place to the park and the studio -- taking a bus from Hyde Park Corner across London to Islington. . . The canvas was soft and grey like the sky. . . The first lines were like the streets. Finding one's way across town, in a strange place, or across the canvas, is knowing that one is alive."

London offered opportunities to see and study the work of contemporary artists. She frequently went to galleries and museums. She was particularly inspired by Nigel Greenwood's gallery at Sloane Square and the New Art Center, which showed the work of Prunella Clough. She saw Manzoni at the Tate; and she met Michael Craig-Martin and Josef Beuys at the ICA in London. During these four years abroad, Enders greatly expanded the scale and repertory of her work.

At her Islington studio, Enders arrived at some of the essential principles of her subsequent work, such as the repetition of similar elements and horizontal orientation of her compositions. She also ventured into large formats, using oil paint, which she prefers to acrylic, while still creating countless watercolors and drawings.

 

Biography

Elizabeth Enders was born Elizabeth McGuire in New London, Connecticut to the late Francis F. McGuire and Helen McGuire. She attended elementary school in New London at the Harbor School and Bulkeley Junior High School. She attended the Williams Memorial Institute for two years, as it became the Williams School and moved to its current location on the Connecticut College campus. Enders completed high school at Abbot Academy (now Phillips Academy) in Andover, Massachusetts. She began her college career at Barnard College in New York City and spent the semester following her sophomore year abroad, traveling to Greece, Rome, and Florence. She returned to New London in January of 1960, enrolled in Connecticut College.

Elizabeth met Anthony Enders in 1961 at a Labor Day party given by Anthony's aunt, Elvia Enders Richards, in nearby Waterford, Connecticut. They were married in June of the following year on the day of their graduations; Anthony's from Harvard Business School and Elizabeth's from Connecticut College. For more than a decade they lived in Boston and Cambridge where Anthony worked as a banker at Brown Brothers Harriman & Co., a company for whom he has worked ever since. During the 1960s, the Enders had four children: Charles, Alexandra, Camilla, and Ostrom (Jack), the youngest, born in 1969. In the summer of 1965, Elizabeth began to exhibit her work: her first was an exhibition at the Stonington Art Gallery in Stonington, Connecticut, followed by a solo show at the Paul Schuster Gallery in Cambridge, Massachusetts in June, 1966. In 1971, Enders, along with several other artists, opened the Inman Square Artists Co-op at Inman Square in Cambridge.

In 1973, Anthony's position at Brown Brothers, Harriman took the family to London for four years. In addition to her role as mother of four school-aged children, Enders found the time to paint. During these four years abroad, she greatly expanded the scale and repertory of her work.

The Enders family returned to the U.S. in 1977 and settled in New York on the Upper East Side of Manhattan. Elizabeth soon enrolled in several evening courses at the School of Visual Arts and in 1987 she received her M.A. from New York University. That year she joined the Board of Artists Space in New York, along with Irving Sandler, Richard Armstrong, Elizabeth Murray, Cindy Sherman, and Carolyn Alexander.

Soon after receiving her masters' degree, Enders began to find recognition as an artist with one-person exhibitions. Among her most important solo exhibitions were shows at the Ulysses gallery in New York (1992 and 1994), the Lyman Allyn Art Museum (1994), and the Charles Cowles Gallery in New York (1995). Exhibitions at Artists Space, New York (2001); the Charles E. Shain Library at Connecticut College (2004 and 2006); Real Art Ways in Hartford, Connecticut (2004), and the Chester Art Association, Chester, Nova Scotia followed.

Today, Elizabeth Enders lives and works in New York City and in Waterford, Connecticut. Her work can be found in public and private collections across the country, including the Addison Gallery of American Art, the Brooklyn Museum, Connecticut College, the Wadsworth Atheneum Museum of Art, the Lyman Allyn Art Museum, the Art Gallery of Nova Scotia, the Florence Griswold Museum, the Dow Jones Art Collection, and the art collection at Pfizer, Inc.

 

Label text from the exhibition


Black Eyed Susan, 1958
Watercolor on paper
1958.301
Courtesy of the Artist
 
Black Eyed Susan is one of the earliest extant works by the artist. It demonstrates Enders' sensitive observation of the simple botanical subject presented in various stages of maturing. The effect of time will re-appear in various forms in subsequent botanical drawings.
 
 
Untitled II, Save the Ocean Series, 1971
Watercolor on paper
1970.302
Courtesy of the Artist
 
Enders supported ecological movement ahead of her time with the Save the Ocean Series. Here she demonstrates her interest in horizontal arrangement of compositional elements that was to be used in many of her later pieces.
 
 
This is a Public Beach III, 1972
Acrylic, colored pencil, pencil on canvas
1972.102
Courtesy of the Artist
 
 
Line, 1974
Oil, acrylic on canvas
1974.200
Collection of Max & Olga Dolgicer
 
Exploring the issues of scale, Enders began to create large pieces in the l970s. Here, the artist marks the canvas with a multitude of vertical strokes of paint in vivid colors, organized in six horizontal bands. The energetic strokes introduced here will become essential in her later series dealing with abstracted lettering and calligraphy.
 
 
Tea, 1974
Tea bags on linen
1974.602
Courtesy of the Artist
 
When Enders family moved to London in l973, the importance of tea, this staple of British life, became paramount. Enders immortalized tea in this work: each seemingly identical used tea bag represents a distinct universe endowed with its own "volume" and "horizon line."
 
 
Limb II, 1975
Nylon stocking, oil on linen
1975.300
Courtesy of the Artist
 
 
The Cry, 1975
Gouache on Bristol board
1975.300
Courtesy of the Artist
 
 
Dust, 1976
Dust, tea, oil on linen
1976.600
Courtesy of the Artist
 
In the early l970s Enders identified with the Feminist movement. As a young mother of four, she struggled to find time to paint. Several of her works from that time are assemblages displaying elements of her everyday reality. Here we are presented with two large discs from a European clothes dryer, containing solidified traces of dust and lint that are attached to the canvas.
 
 
Untitled, 1977
Oil on linen
1977.200
Courtesy of the Artist
 
 
Armies and Honors, 1977
Watercolor, colored pencil, pencil on Bristol board
1977.300
Collection of the Addison Gallery of American Art, Andover Mass.
 
This series was conceived while Enders lived in London. She observed the daily rituals of the city, such as the changing of the guards at Buckingham palace. In this image, she is commenting on a major political event of the time, President Nixon's visit to China. The images of endless rows of Chinese soldiers greeting the American delegation were another impetus for this series.
 
 
Notes on Returning Books to Library, 1977
Gouache, pen, ink on paper
1977.305
Courtesy of the Artist
 
 
Second Text, 1982
Gouache on paper
1982.304
Courtesy of Mr. and Mrs. Jack Enders
 
 
Blue Field, 1986
Oil on linen
1986.200
Collection of Agatha and Scott Habjan
 
 
Red Field, 1986
Oil on linen
1986.201
Courtesy of the Artist
 
 
Maine/Blue, 1987
Watercolor on paper
1987.301
Courtesy of the Artist
 
In l986 Enders visited the coast of Maine. She returned for a lengthy stay the following year, in l987. The coastal atmosphere and the ocean's hues became important subjects for the artist for years to come. Enders began the investigation of the varied tones of blue in an extensive series of watercolors of marine subjects that was to become a dominant part of her overall oeuvre.
 
 
Maine Series VI, 1987
Watercolor on paper
1987.308
Courtesy of the Artist
 
 
Map II, 1990
Watercolor, pencil on paper
1990.305
Courtesy of the Artist
 
During her extensive travels, Enders became fascinated with maps. She began to see them simultaneously as works of art and as information charts. Whether traveling abroad by land or sailing in New England, maps and charts are necessary companions.
 
Since the Middle Ages, maps were seen as more than practical documents. Some were rather accurate; others are an imaginary construct, serving sociopolitical purposes. It is this expanded view of maps that fascinates Enders, who created some captivating cartographic compositions. Beginning in l990, Enders created a number of imaginary maps, as we see here.
 
 
Journal/Patriarchy Room, 1991
Watercolor, ink on paper
1991.323
Courtesy of the Artist
 
 
Atlantic, 1992
Oil on linen
1992.200
Collection of Andrew Kaufmann
 
Employing the graduated blues of the ocean, green of the coastal vegetation, and the ochre tones of the dunes, Elizabeth Enders created an homage to her beloved Atlantic coast. This piece, however, has yet another meaning. The marks painted over a portion of the surface stand for a private alphabet and comprise a letter from Enders to her sister, to whom this piece is dedicated.
 
 
Poetry/Garden, 1992
Oil on linen
1992.202
Collection of Mr. and Mrs. Brian Berris
 
Since her youth, Enders was interested in poetry and engaged in creative writing. Her love of words was later translated into the calligraphic signs that became vital components of many of her works.
 
 
Letter to My Brother, 1992
Oil on linen
1992.205
Collection of the Addison Gallery of American Art, Andover, Massachusetts
 
 
Legal Brief I, 1992
Acrylic on paper
1992.400
Collection of Camilla Enders and Jim Bernfield
 
 
Dark Text, 1993
Oil on linen
1993.300
Collection of the Lyman Allyn Art Museum
 
 
Blue I, 1994
Watercolor on paper
1994.300
Courtesy of the Artist
 
 
Blue IV, 1994
Watercolor on paper
1994.303
Courtesy of the Artist
 
 
Journal/Jan 13, 1995
Watercolor, ink on foolscap
1995.300
Courtesy of the Artist
 
For many years, Enders recorded her ideas on pages of ordinary yellow pads. In copious notes, she connects her love of visual thinking and writing, into a seamless whole. Drawn on the most common paper available, these studies are fresh, energetic, jewel-like. Many of these fascinating sketches were later translated into large compositions.
 
 
Journal/Feb.27, 1995
Watercolor, ink on foolscap
1995.302
Courtesy of the Artist
 
 
Journal/Feb 27, 1995
Watercolor, ink on foolscap
L995.303
Courtesy of the Artist
 
 
Journal/11-3-95
Watercolor, ink on foolscap
1995.500
Courtesy of the Artist
 
There is a special relationship that Enders has always had with the format of a page, which can be traced to her keeping a journal in her early writing class. She remembers: "Notebooks were always so important, so I started having a connection with a written page. I also like to think of all the work as having a connection with books -- as a page and a book in a library -- so I often start with the idea of a blank, lined notebook page."
 
 
Journal/10-5-95
Watercolor, ink on foolscap
Courtesy of the Artist
 
 
Journal/10-12-95
Watercolor, ink on foolscap
1995.501
Courtesy of the Artist
 
 
Journal/12-8-95
Watercolor, ink on foolscap
1995.502
Courtesy of the Artist
 
 
Journal/ 12-28-95
Watercolor, ink on foolscap
1995.503
Courtesy of the Artist
 
 
Journal/March 13, 1996
Watercolor, ink on foolscap
1996.310
Courtesy of the Artist
 
 
Poem, l995,
12-18-95
Courtesy of the Artist
 
 
White Books I, 1996
Watercolor, ink on paper
1996.350
 
Courtesy of the Artist
 
White Books II, 1996
Watercolor, ink on paper
1996.351
Courtesy of the Artist
 
The depiction of the human figure, or its segments, was occasionally in the forefront of Enders' interests. In the mid l990s she created a series that explored central elements of human anatomy, as she does here.
 
 
Blue IV, 1997
Watercolor on paper
1997.303
Courtesy of the Artist
 
Marks/Ochre I, Language Series, 1997
Acrylic on Chinese newspaper
1997.401
Courtesy of the Artist
 
Owing to the proximity of Enders' studio in Lower Manhattan to Chinatown, the English dailies alternated with the Chinese newspapers as a support for the works in this series. In each work, a monochrome color field is painted first. It is divided by horizontal and vertical lines into a grid of almost equal rectangles. Each section is marked by a number of energetic vertical strokes. The grid itself suggests the pages of an open book, supporting our natural tendency to "read" Enders' paintings. While traveling daily to her studio, she passed by the plethora of signs, printed materials and newspapers, which inspired this series.
 
 
Marks/White I, Language Series, 1997
Acrylic on Chinese newspaper
1997.404
Courtesy of the Artist
 
 
Marks/Red, Language Series, 1997
Acrylic on newspaper
1997.405
Courtesy of the Artist.
 
 
Landscape/Language, Field Series III,
1997
Acrylic on newspaper
1997.449
Courtesy of the Artist
 
 
Journal/3-17-97
Ink, watercolor on foolscap
1997.503
Courtesy of the Artist
 
 
Untitled, l998
Acrylic on vintage paper
1998.473
Courtesy of the Artist
 
 
Volcano, l999
Watercolor on cardboard
1999.317
Private Collection
 
 
Oceanus, 2000
Watercolor on paper
2000.308a
Courtesy of the Artist
 
 
Map (Oceanus), 2000-2007
Pigment print, AP
2007.600
Courtesy of the Artist
 
This image is drawn with a nod to the actual world map, or a globe, that is translated loosely into a shape of a skull. At the time when global warming and other environmental issues are politicized, these works are reminders of the world/mind/globe/ ocean interdependencies and the responsibilities which we have for the future of our planet.
 
 
Untitled I, Dark Series, 2001
Watercolor on paper
Courtesy of the Artist and the Charles Cowles Gallery
 
 
Untitled III, Dark Series, 2001
Watercolor on paper
Courtesy of the Artist and the Charles Cowles Gallery
 
 
Look at Art, 2001
Watercolor on paper
2001.305a
Courtesy of the Artist
 
 
Untitled, 2002
Watercolor, pencil on paper
2002.303
Courtesy of the Artist
 
 
Breakfast I, 2002
Watercolor on paper
2002.310
Courtesy of the Artist
 
 
Silence I, 2002
Watercolor on paper
2002.319
Courtesy of the Artist
 
 
Dinner/Silence I, 2002
Watercolor on paper
2002.320a
Courtesy of the Artist
 
 
Fast Food/Bananas, 2002
Watercolor on paper
2002.321a
Courtesy of the Artist
 
 
Silence/Saffron, 2002
Watercolor on paper
2002.322
Courtesy of the Artist
 
 
Colors/Dust, 2002
Watercolor on paper
2002.325
Courtesy of the Artist
 
 
Untitled/Boxes, 2003
Oil on linen
2003.210
Courtesy of the Artist
 
 
Lunch III, 2003
Oil on cardboard
2003.219
Courtesy of the Artist
 
 
Lunch IV, 2003
Watercolor on paper
2003.220
Courtesy of the Artist
 
 
Freesia I, 2003
Colored pencil, pencil on paper
2003.303
Courtesy of the Artist
 
Drawings of flowers are among the earliest examples of Enders' work. After an extensive series of works dedicated to 9/11, where the abstract calligraphy and geometry commanded the image, the artist turned her attention one more time beginning in 2003, toward the fragile beauty of the botanical subjects.
 
 
White Ranunculus III, 2003
Colored pencil, pencil on paper
2002.312
Courtesy of the Artist
 
 
Yellow Anemone/Purple Veronica II, Series I, 2003
Watercolor, pencil on paper
2003.315
Courtesy of the Artist
 
 
Blue Water II, 2004
Watercolor on paper
2004.321
Courtesy of the Artist
 
 
Rose Hips/Rose, 2004
Colored pencil, pencil on paper
2004.315
Courtesy of the Artist and Susan Frei Nathan, Fine Works of Paper
 
 
Untitled/Blue/Ochre I, 2005
Oil on canvas
2005.202
Courtesy of the Artist
 
 
Untitled/Blue/Ochre II, 2005
Oil on canvas
2005.203
Courtesy of the Artist
 
 
Untitled/Blue/Ochre III, 2003-05
Oil on canvas
2005.204
Courtesy of the Artist
 
 
Untitled/Blue/Ochre IV, 2005
Oil on canvas
2005.205
Courtesy of the Artist
 
 
Ranunculus/Rose Hips III, 2005
Colored pencil, pencil on paper
2005.304
Courtesy of the Artist
 
 
Untitled/Lanugalosa I, 2005
Colored pencil, pencil on paper
2005.311
Courtesy of the Artist
 
 
Untitled/Nova Scotia IV, 2005
Watercolor on paper
2005.323
Courtesy of the Artist
 
Enders began visiting Chester in Nova Scotia in the l990s. Intimately familiar with every detail of the local topography, the artist records the ever-changing atmosphere of the coastline in numerous oil paintings, watercolors, and gouaches. Presently she is one of the most dedicated and accomplished contemporary American marine painters.
 
 
Untitled/Nova Scotia VIII, 2005
Watercolor on paper
2005.327
Collection of Helen C. McGuire
 
 
Pineapple, 2006
Colored pencil, pencil on paper
2006.309
Collection of the Artist
 
 
Nova Scotia XIV, 2006
Watercolor on paper
2006.338
Courtesy of the Artist
 
 
Untitled/Garden/Sweet Pleasures, 2007
Oil on linen
Courtesy of the Artist and the Charles Cowles Gallery
 
 
Iris/Peony/Chive II, Day I, 2007
Colored pencil, pencil on paper
2007.304
Courtesy of the Artist and Susan Frei Nathan, Fine Works on Paper
 
 
Pussy Willow II, 2007
Colored pencil, pencil on paper
2007.314
Courtesy of the Artist and Susan Frei Nathan, Fine Works on Paper
 
 
Yellow Peony II, 2007
Colored pencil, pencil on paper
2007.323
Courtesy of the Artist
 
 
Green I, 2008
Oil on canvas
2008.200
Collection of Mr. and Mrs. David Sorensen
 
 
Green II, 2008
Oil on canvas
2008.201
Courtesy of the Artist
 
 
Untitled, 2008
Oil on linen
2008.215
Courtesy of the Artist
 
 
Red Anemone I, 2008
Colored pencil, pencil on paper
2008.302ab
Courtesy of the Artist
 
 
White Amaryllis/White Anemone V, 2008
Colored pencil, pencil on paper
2008,309
Courtesy of the Artist
 
 
Untitled V, 2008
Watercolor on paper
2008.340
Courtesy of the Artist
 
 
Untitled/ Nova Scotia, 2008
Watercolor on paper
2008.364
Courtesy of the Artist
 
 
Cape LaHave VIII, 2008
Watercolor on paper
2008.372
Courtesy of the Artist
 
 
Marnie's Amaryllis III, 2008
Watercolor on paper
2008.397
Courtesy of the Artist
 
 
Marnie's Amaryllis IV, 2008
Watercolor on paper
2008.398
Courtesy of the Artist

 

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