American Chronicles: The Art of Norman Rockwell

March 8 - May 31, 2009



 

Additional images for the exhibition

 

(above: Norman Rockwell, The Problem We All Live With, 1963, Painting for Look illustration, January 14, 1964. Oil on canvas, Norman Rockwell Museum Collection)

 

(above: Norman Rockwell, The Stay at Homes (Outward Bound), 1927, Painting for Ladies' Home Journal illustration, October 1927, Oil on canvas. A small boy wears a sailor suit. His grandfather, in a navy captain's hat, holds him close. They watch a departing ship that represents the generation of this sailing family leaving for the high seas. Rockwell did not make this picture for commercial purposes. Instead, this painting is his own independent expression, revealing the value he had for nurturing intergenerational relationships.. Norman Rockwell Art Collection Trust)

 

(above: Norman Rockwell, Welcome to Elmville, 1929, Painting for The Saturday Evening Post cover, April 20, 1929, Oil on canvas. The sheriff crouches, stopwatch in hand, whistle in mouth. Pale streaks across the bottom of the canvas represent a car that has sped by. Here, Rockwell creates an image to illustrate a trend reported in the news. Rather than increase taxes on residents, towns had police set up speed traps to raise money through fines.. Norman Rockwell Museum Collection)

 

(above: Norman Rockwell, Going and Coming, 1947, Painting for The Saturday Evening Post cover, August 30, 1947, Oil on canvas. Norman Rockwell Art Collection Trust)

 

(above: Norman Rockwell, Girl at Mirror, 1954, Painting for The Saturday Evening Post cover, March 6, 1954, Oil on canvas.Norman Rockwell Art Collection Trust)

 

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