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Women Only! In Their Studios

February 16 - March 30, 2008

 

Women Only! In Their Studios is on view at the Lowe Art Museum, University of Miami from February 16 through March 30, 2008. Contemporary women artists who have exhibited extensively in galleries and museums in the United States and worldwide deplore how little their work is recognized by the American public. This exhibition is an eclectic assemblage of fifty paintings, photographs, works on paper, sculpture, quilts, and videos by twenty women who broke through the glass ceiling, in fact shattered it, but incredibly are not yet household names, as well as photos of artists studios. Each artist is an innovator who added distinct marks along the path of modern art -- from abstract expressionism to conceptualism and appropriationism, and everything in between.

The viewer will be invigorated by a rich modern American tapestry since the artists are culturally as diverse as the strands that make up our great melting pot: white, black, American Indian, Chicano, Chinese, Jews and Christians. Their basic expressive means are as boldly distinctive as their cultures are different. Included are Jennifer Bartlett, Amalia Mesa-Bains, Camille Billops, Elizabeth Catlett, Linda Freeman, Ann Hamilton, Grace Hartigan, Jenny Holzer, Barbara Kruger, Elizabeth Murray, Howardena Pindell, Laurie Simmons, Faith Ringgold, Miriam Schapiro, Jaune Quick-To-See Smith, Joan Snyder, Pat Steir, Gail Tremblay, Jackie Winsor, and Flo Oy Wong.

Enlivening the exhibition are twenty autobiographical reflections that provide first person insights into artistic inspiration, drive, and process. The exhibition at the Lowe is part of a seven city national tour over a two and a half year period. The next venue for the exhibition will be the Eleanor D. Wilson Museum at Hollins University, Roanoke, VA, from April 20 through June 29, 2008.

The exhibition was curated by Eleanor Flomenhaft and the tour was developed and managed by Smith Kramer Fine Art Services, an exhibition tour development company in Kansas City, Missouri.

Complementing Women Only, the Lowe presents a selection entitled, Labors of Love: Women Artists from the Permanent Collection. This exhibition is curated by Gita Shonek and will be on view in Matus Hall through 2008.

 

About Smith Kramer Fine Art Services

Founded in 1981 by David Smith, Smith Kramer Fine Art Services has enjoyed twenty-five years of growth in serving the art community. In partnership with the institutions and collectors, Smith Kramer Fine Art Services budgets, markets, crates, insures, transports, and handles all services of the exhibition from concept to completion. -- edited text, courtesy Smith Kramer Fine Art Services. Also see The David Smith Story: Sharing the Arts (11/14/97).

 

 

(above: AMALIA MESA-BAINS, Transparent Migration, 2002, sculpture: mirrored armoire, glass, textile. Courtesy of Amalia Mesa-Bains)

 

(above: ELIZABETH CATLETT, Stepping Out, 2000, patinated bronze. Courtesy of June Kelly Gallery and Elizabeth Catlett)

 

(above: LINDA FREEMAN, A Little Madness, 1999, oil. Courtesy of Linda Freeman)

 

Click here for more images

 

Introductory wall panel text from the exhibition

Women Only! In their Studios
Curated by Eleanor Flomenhaft
Studio and Portrait Photographs by Lucille Tortora
 
Contemporary women artists who have exhibited in galleries and museums in the United States and in most cases worldwide deplore how little the American public recognizes their work. Our exhibit endeavors to acquaint a larger audience with the accomplishments of twenty exceptional women artists. Included are Amalia Mesa-Bains, Jennifer Bartlett, Camille Billops, Elizabeth Catlett, Linda Freeman, Ann Hamilton, Grace Hartigan, Jenny Holzer, Barbara Kruger, Elizabeth Murray, Howardena Pindell, Faith Ringgold, Miriam Schapiro, Laurie Simmons, Jaune Quick-to-See Smith, Joan Snyder, Pat Steir, Gail Tremblay, Jackie Winsor and Flo Oy Wong.
 
Thirty five years ago there were virtually no feminine artists shown in most museums or galleries. Intelligent women were supposed to be raising families; painters or sculptors were hardly noticed. Women were enjoined to be polite, to keep feelings private that differed from the social norm. Of course, art can be expressed secretly, and is often in itself a revolt particularly against the past. But unrecognized talent was insufficient for women of a certain mettle. Change was demanded. The twentieth century ushered in new visions of things. Suffragettes brought about woman's right to vote. Women became professionals as a result of World War II's need for labor. They became accepted in many male dominated work roles. But not until the feminist revolution in the early 70s, coming on the heels of the Vietnam War, did women campaign vociferously for their rightful place in the art world. Their art was created on a tabular rasa. Content would come from their common experience. Feminine materials and iconography would be integral to their art. Works were created with fabric, wallpaper, sequins, beading, and anything that referred to their lives without apologies and without stint. In fact they laid the basis for the art of many male artists to express ideas that they had formally repressed.
 
This is an eclectic assemblage of works by remarkable women who broke through the glass ceiling, in fact shattered it. Clearly they are all totally centered. Each has reached a secure place within herself, which was hard fought.
 
-- Eleanor Flomenhaft

Object labels from the exhibition

AMALIA MESA-BAINS
Transparent Migration
2002
sculpture: mirrored armoire, glass, textile
Courtesy of Amalia Mesa-Bains
 
JENNIFER BARTLETT
Shadow
1984-1985
etching, aquatint, spit bite and drypoint in color
Courtesy of Bob Carlson, Gallery Karl Oskar
 
JENNIFER BARTLETT
4 O'Clock
1992-1993
charcoal, chalk and silkscreen on Saunders paper
Courtesy of Signet Arts
 
CAMILLE BILLOPS
KKK Bootique
1994
offset lithograph
Courtesy of Camille Billops
 
CAMILLE BILLOPS
Zip Coon
1992
drawing
Courtesy of Camille Billops
 
CAMILLE BILLOPS
Mammy's Little Coal Black Rose
1992
lithograph
Courtesy of Camille Billops
 
ELIZABETH CATLETT
Webbed Woman
1995
bronze
Courtesy of June Kelly Gallery and Elizabeth Catlett
 
ELIZABETH CATLETT
Fluted Head
1997
patinated bronze
Courtesy of June Kelly Gallery and Elizabeth Catlett
 
ELIZABETH CATLETT
Stepping Out
2000
patinated bronze
Courtesy of June Kelly Gallery and Elizabeth Catlett
 
ELIZABETH CATLETT
There is a Woman in Every Color
1975-2004
linocut, silkscreen and woodcut
Courtesy of Sragow Gallery, New York City
 
ELIZABETH CATLETT
Black is Beautiful
1968-2003
lithograph on paper
Courtesy of Sragow Gallery, New York City
 
LINDA FREEMAN
Children see Through Darkness
1998
oil on canvas, fabric borders
Courtesy of Linda Freeman
 
LINDA FREEMAN
In the Month of Green Fire
2001
oil, collage, and construction
Courtesy of Linda Freeman
 
LINDA FREEMAN
A Little Madness
1999
oil
Courtesy of Linda Freeman
 
ANN HAMILTON
(phora·4)
2005
iris print on Somerset Velvet paper (Radiant White 330g/sgm)
Courtesy of Sean Kelly Gallery, New York
 
ANN HAMILTON
(phora·1)
2005
iris print on Somerset Velvet paper (Radiant White 330g/sgm)
Courtesy of Sean Kelly Gallery, New York
 
GRACE HARTIGAN
Grazie Rosetti
1995
oil on canvas
Courtesy of ACA Galleries, New York
 
GRACE HARTIGAN
Follies of 1927
1989
oil on canvas
Courtesy of ACA Galleries, New York
 
GRACE HARTIGAN
Blood and Wine
1975
oil on canvas
Courtesy of ACA Galleries, New York
 
JENNY HOLZER
Inflammatory Essays
1979-1982
colored poster set in an unlimited edition
Courtesy of © 2005 Jenny Holzer, Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York
 
BARBARA KRUGER
Lust
No date
photographic print
Courtesy of Barbara Kruger
 
ELIZABETH MURRAY
Untitled
circa 1985
color pencil on graph paper
Courtesy of Signet Arts
 
ELIZABETH MURRAY
Untitled
2001
from the Doctor's of The World portfolio
pigmented digital output
edition 5 of 100
Courtesy of John Szoke Editions
 
HOWARDENA PINDELL
East - West: Music Making Angel
1986
acrylic, postcards, tempera, gouache on museum board
Courtesy of Howardena Pindell
 
HOWARDENA PINDELL
India: Siva/Ganges
1985
acrylic, polymer, photo transfer paper on canvas
Courtesy of Howardena Pindell
 
HOWARDENA PINDELL
Kyoto: Shisendo
1982
acrylic, dye, paper on canvas
Courtesy of Howardena Pindell
 
FAITH RINGGOLD
Who's Afraid of Aunt Jemima?
1983
acrylic on canvas with dyed, painted and pieced fabric
Courtesy of ACA Galleries, New York
 
FAITH RINGGOLD
The French Collection Part I, #2 Wedding on the Seine
1991
acrylic on canvas with pieced fabric border
Courtesy of ACA Galleries, New York
 
FAITH RINGGOLD
Tar Beach #2
2003
silkscreen on silk
Courtesy of ACA Galleries, New York
 
MIRIAM SCHAPIRO
The Garden
1990
acrylic and fabric on canvas
Courtesy of Miriam Schapiro
 
MIRIAM SCHAPIRO
Beauty of Summer
1973-1974
acrylic and fabric on canvas
Courtesy of Miriam Schapiro
 
MIRIAM SCHAPIRO
My Nosegays are for Captives
1976
collage and acrylic on canvas
Courtesy of Miriam Schapiro
 
LAURIE SIMMONS
Talking Glove
1988
cibachrome print edition 2/5
Courtesy of Laurie Simmons and Sperone West Water Gallery
 
LAURIE SIMMONS
Talking Coconut (String Dispenser)
1989
cibachrome print
Courtesy of Laurie Simmons and Sperone West Water Gallery
 
JAUNE QUICK-TO-SEE SMITH
Fear
2004
mixed media on canvas
Courtesy of Jaune Quick-To-See Smith and Flomenhaft Gallery
 
JAUNE QUICK-TO-SEE SMITH
The Child Within
2004
mixed media on canvas
Courtesy of Jaune Quick-To-See Smith and Flomenhaft Gallery
 
JAUNE QUICK-TO-SEE SMITH
King of the Mountain
2005
oil on canvas
Courtesy of Jaune Quick-To-See Smith and Flomenhaft Gallery
 
JOAN SNYDER
Becoming Magenta
2001
oil, acrylic, paper mache & herbs on linen
Courtesy of Betty Cuningham Gallery, New York City, New York
 
JOAN SNYDER
Saying Goodbye IV
1994
oil, acrylic, pastel, and wooden dowels on canvas
Courtesy of Betty Cuningham Gallery, New York City, New York
 
JOAN SNYDER
Wild Prayer
2001
oil, acrylic, paper mache, herbs and beads on linen on board
Courtesy of Betty Cuningham Gallery, New York City, New York
 
PAT STEIR
Little Ghost Going
2001
oil on canvas
Courtesy of Pat Steir and Cheim & Read Gallery, New York
 
GAIL TREMBLAY
Exploding Star
1990
metal on wood
Courtesy of Gail Tremblay
 
GAIL TREMBLAY
Transcendent Cloud Bears Gifts of Rain
1991
wool, padouk, feathers, wire, and beads
Courtesy of Gail Tremblay
 
GAIL TREMBLAY
Speaking in the Weaver's Tongue
2005
woven paper collage
Courtesy of Gail Tremblay
 
JACKIE WINSOR
Black and White Inset Wall Piece, 5 Lines with Black Interior
1992
acrylic altered cement and powdered pigment
Courtesy of Jackie Winsor and Paula Cooper Gallery, New York
 
JACKIE WINSOR
Inset Wall Piece (minor cut blue lines)
2000
black concrete and Plexi
Courtesy of Jackie Winsor and Paula Cooper Gallery, New York
 
FLO OY WONG
My Mother's Baggage: Lucky Daughter
1996
mixed media, photos, suitcase, sequins
Courtesy of Flo Oy Wong
 
FLO OY WONG
1933: Gee Theo Quee
1998
mixed media, rice sack, US flag
Courtesy of Flo Oy Wong
 
FLO OY WONG
Kindred Spirit #1
2001
mixed media, rice sack, silk brocade
Courtesy of Flo Oy Wong
 

 

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