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Revisiting Utah's Past: The Transformed Landscape

December 22, 2006 - August 12, 2007

 

 

(above: Gilbert Davis Munger (1837-1903), American, The Wasatch Mountains and Great Salt Lake in the Foreground, 1877, Oil on canvas. Friends of the Art Museum and Mr. Kenneth Nebenzahl. Museum #1977.022)

 

Ever wonder what Salt Lake Valley looked like to those intrepid pioneers and early settlers? Or how Park City appeared in the 1920s? As we look to the future of Utah with such development projects as Downtown Rising and the creation of Utah's tallest building, consider taking the time to revisit Utah's unique past.

The Transformed Landscape, an exhibition on view December 22, 2006 through August 12, 2007 at the UMFA, examines how early settlers transformed the undeveloped Utah Territory into a cultured environment. In addition to several panoramic views of the Salt Lake Valley by prominent local nineteenth-century artists, visitors will be able to see paintings of pioneer homes, industrial subjects, and illustrations and photographs of the area with familiar, identifiable buildings. Of particular historic interest is The Utah Territorial Prison (1886) by Francis M. Treseder, a painting from the Museum's permanent collection. Waldo Park Midgley's Second South and Main (1905), another painting from the UMFA's collection, offers a glimpse of an early stage in Salt Lake City's developing "downtown" area, with horse drawn carriages, street lamps, and store fronts.

As a wide range of architectural structures claimed more space in the Salt Lake valley, artists explored ways to interpret how the human presence altered an undisturbed natural landscape. In addition to private homes, the growing society required new devotional, entertainment, and civic spaces, either as separate structures or as one multi-functional building. Artists, therefore, were compelled to incorporate the geometric shapes of buildings into the organic forms of nature without compromising the artistic integrity of either. As the population grew in numbers and diversity, the landscape was transformed by architectural structures that landscape painters could not ignore.

The problems and benefits of progress we face today are similar to those the early Utah settlers faced. Come see how Utah's early artists depicted the transformation of the area's undeveloped desert wilderness to an urban metropolis.

"Revisiting Utah's Past" is dedicated to the memory of John L. (Jack) Jarman and Helen Brown Jarman, who generously supported the Museum's exhibitions program and the expansion of its collections.

 

 

(above: LeConte Stewart (1891-1990), American, Smith's House, 1937, Oil on canvas. Gift of Kay H. Blood. Museum #2001.16/2)


Wall panel and label texts for the exhibition

 

The Transformed Landscape

 

 
Opening Panel:
 
The Transformed Environment is an examination of how differing purposes and ideologies of the Salt Lake Valley's early settlers shaped the character of the built environment of the region. Mormon pioneers shared a collective goal to establish an organized social refuge based on the concept of the City of Zion, designed by the church's founder Joseph Smith in Independence, Missouri in 1833. In contrast, the diverse groups of miners and merchants, who were among the early arrivals to the area, had no common belief system and no plans to build a utopian metropolis in the wilderness. Indeed, non-Mormon settlers founded communities more like those of the American Frontier outside Territorial Utah.
 
Mormon communities were designed to support their social, political, and religious practices. Each community was laid out in a square grid pattern that allowed ample room for each family to have a home, orchard, and garden. In addition, public structures included spaces for devotional, civic, and religious activities that took place either in separate structures or in one multi-functional building. In contrast to the Mormon goal to develop a theocracy based on an agrarian culture, non-Mormon immigrants responded enthusiastically to the economic promise of the abundance of coal, silver, copper, and other minerals in the area. Mormon agrarian purpose combined with non-Mormon business enterprise to create a unique society that changed the landscape from undeveloped desert wilderness to a rapidly developing urban metropolis. As a variety of domestic and public buildings affirmed human presence in the area, landscape artists were compelled to incorporate the geometric shapes of buildings into organic forms of nature to create visual documents of the area's growth.
 
The paintings and drawings in this exhibition are the works of Utah's pioneering artists, dating from the 1850s through the 1930s. Their interpretations of a changing landscape offer a glimpse of the Salt Lake Valley's emerging culture with images that add an important dimension to the history of American art. The works are visual records of a place that changed rapidly from uncultivated wilderness to built urban environment. Early settlers included Mormon refugees in search of isolation and peace, and non-Mormon merchants, federal officials, miners, and railroad employees who actively established contacts beyond Utah. These diverse groups re-shaped the region's character as they built homes, shops, mills, and other structures to support their needs. As wilderness was transformed into a built environment, artists made subjective responses to the changes with images that capture the character, quality, and purposes of early buildings.
 
 
Painting near opening panel:
 
Henry Lavender Adolphus Culmer (1854-1914) American born in England
View of the Salt Lake Valley
On loan from private owners
Museum #2006.46.1
 
Some of Salt Lake City's existing prominent buildings can be identified in H.L.A.Culmer's expansive view from an east bench location. Culmer painted the drama of the changing environment as buildings inevitably claimed more and more of the valley. Culmer's careful observation of natural forms is evident in the View of the Salt Lake Valley in which the growth of the city seems almost secondary to the meticulously rendered details of the undeveloped areas.
 
Gilbert Davis Munger (1837-1903), American
The Wasatch Mountains and Great Salt Lake in the Foreground, 1877
Oil on canvas
Friends of the Art Museum and Mr. Kenneth Nebenzahl
Museum #1977.022
 
Munger label:
 
In 1867 the United States Congress funded a geological and geographical exploration to be led by Clarence King. The exploration's purpose was to complete a scientific survey of the topography and natural resources along the fortieth parallel of latitude that included the route of the Central and Union Pacific railroads. As the guest artist with the 1869 Survey, Gilbert Davis Munger hoped to discover scenic wonders in unexplored regions of the country that would insure his professional standing as a landscape painter. By sharing ideas with the survey's team of photographers, he developed new standards of representational fidelity and topographical accuracy. Munger's numerous sketches of Utah's landscapes were later translated into large scale landscape paintings of the region add to the record of the nation's geological history.
 
Albert Bierstadt (1830-1902), American born in Germany
Near Salt Lake City, 1859
27 _" x 24 _"
MOA
 
Bierstadt label:
 
Central to any discussion of nineteenth-century survey expeditions, the art market, and the important contribution of photography to both, is Albert Bierstadt who almost single-handedly defined the Western American landscape tradition. Born in Germany and raised in Massachusetts, he studied painting with Emanuel Leutze, another German-American, who introduced him to sketching on-site in Germany's Harz Mountains and the Swiss Alps. This experience formed his understanding of landscape, and transferred readily to the grand-scale paintings of the American West for which he is known. In a letter published in The Crayon in 1859, Bierstadt wrote:
 
"The (Rocky) Mountains are very fine, as seen from the plains, they resemble the Bernese Alps, one of the finest ranges in Europe...They are of granite formation, the same as Swiss mountains."
 
Bierstadt's panoramic views of Western landscapes dominated by formidable mountains supported the concept of Manifest Destiny, the nineteenth century phrase that implied the inevitability of the Union's continued territorial expansion to the west and south. By the time he painted Near Salt Lake City, the Indian camps, symbolic of wilderness, that are visible in many of his earlier works have been displaced by white settlements. Responding to public curiosity about the country's remote territories, Bierstadt painted landscapes that were intended to convey the sublime qualities of sparsely settled western regions. Near Salt Lake City is small compared to the large landscapes for which he is known but it is no less comprehensive. With characteristic attention to detail, Bierstadt depicts a determined settlement sandwiched between a background of a formidable mountain range and a detailed representation of undeveloped foreground.
 
 
Panel I: 16" x 20"
 
 

Personal Refuge

 

 
Map of SLC 1870 -- showing Plat of SLC P0 251 #47: Courtesy of the J. Willard Marriott Library's Photo Archives department
 
Mormons who settled the Salt Lake Valley in the mid nineteenth-century founded communities based on Mormon Church Founder Joseph Smith's original Plat of the City of Zion. Although the semi-arid landscape adjoining the Wasatch Range required some modification, the plan remained generally faithful to Smith's original design. Communities were laid out in square grid patterns that allowed space for each family to have a home, garden and an orchard. Public squares were designated for churches, schools, and civic building, while factories and farms were located beyond town boundaries.
 
The large number of separate homes affirmed Mormon emphasis on family as the central unit of a society. As the developing economy allowed for better living standards, homes reflected individual tastes as well as the particular requirements of Mormon society. Although plural marriage did not produce a special style, it required separate quarters for each wife. Brigham Young's Lion House was an architectural solution to the problem of housing several families.
 
 
 
Brigham Young's Compound: Photo courtesy of the Utah State Historical Society
 
 
Danquart Anthon Weggeland (1827-1918), American, born in Norway
Old Salt Lake, 1868
MOA
 
Danquart Anthon Weggeland (1827-1918), American, born in Norway
North State Street (Brigham Young's back yard), 1868
UAC
 
Panel II: 16" x 20"
 
 

Domestic Architecture

 

 
Great Salt Lake City -- Photo 979.21 courtesy of the Utah State Historical Society
 
Early domestic structures reflected necessity rather than aesthetic or religious aspirations. Tents, wagon boxes, and hillside dugouts provided shelter for the first arrivals to the Salt Lake Valley. Logs and adobe were available building materials for the earliest homes, but as lumber was also needed for fuel, fences, and furniture, most homes were of adobe brick. Although these structures provided adequate shelter, there are reports of invading insects and rattlesnakes, and the dirt floors were a formidable housekeeping challenge.
 
"As Mormon communal villages became secure from Indian attacks, the greatest expanses of sagebrush were broken at long intervals by a lone adobe house and root cellar surrounded by patches of plowed earth and the green of winter wheat. An irrigation stream flowed by, lined with row of Mormon poplars as windbreaks. With desperate innovation, or they would have starved, the settlers became America's irrigation pioneers, and set the laws and rules for all peoples living 'under the ditch.'"
Papanikolas, Helen, The Peoples of Utah, Utah: Utah State Historical Society, 1981
While most early homes were modest in scale and constructed of locally quarried stone, materials for Territorial Utah's most impressive homes included fired brick, granite, and wood, affirmed business success rather than agrarian enterprise or ecclesiastical standing. Many of Utah's personal fortunes of the late nineteenth-century, amassed by non-Mormons, affirmed business success rather than agrarian enterprise of ecclesiastical standing, and were the outcomes of mining and commerce.
 
.Elaborate homes were designed by commissioned architects who were aware of prevailing national architectural conventions, surface textures and appropriate materials. An example is the Kearns mansion, built in 1902 by Thomas Kearns, owner of Park City's Silver King Mine. Designed by Carl M. Newhausen and constructed of limestone quarried in Sanpete County, the home was donated to the State of Utah by Jennie Kearns after her husband's death on condition that it serve as the official residence of the State's governors.
 
 
Kearns Mansion: Photo courtesy of the Utah State Historical Society
 
 
Painting near Panel II
 
 
Danquart Anthon Weggeland (1827-1918), American, Norwegian born
Early Days in Salt Lake Valley or Pioneer Home
16 _" x 19 _"
On loan from the Springville Museum of Art, Springville, Utah
 
Herman H. Haag (1871-1895), American
First Building in Utah
On loan from the Museum of Church History and Art
 
Haag label:
 
Born in Stuttgart, Germany, Herman Haag immigrated to Salt Lake City where he became one of James T. Harwood's painting students. In 1889 he joined Harwood in Paris for study at the Académie Julian where he won an award for composition. When Haag returned to Utah in the early 1890s he was appointed to the faculty of the Art Department, University of Utah where he taught from 1893-1894. Tragically his early death cut short a promising career as a gifted painter and teacher.
 
Carl Christian Anton Christensen (1831-1912), American, Danish born
Home Sweet Home, 1875
Oil on panel
Gift of Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Palmer
Museum #1991.069.009
 
Christensen label:
 
Carl C. A. Christensen arrived in the Salt Lake valley in 1857 from Denmark. He entered the Territory "with the Danish flag flying from his cart and his trousers flapping in tatters around his legs." He left briefly to study painting with Philip Barlag in Denmark and, after his return to Utah, concentrated primarily on paintings of the local landscape. From 1869 until 1890 he painted monumental narrative scenes, each 8 by 12 feet, depicting scenes of Mormon history. These were attached in sequence on a roller as a continuous scroll, 3000 feet long, with which he traveled throughout the settlements telling an illustrated story of Mormonism. He is also known for his carefully crafted genre paintings of an idealized view of pioneering life, such as this painting of his home in Ephraim, Utah that portrays an idealized version of pioneer life.
 
 
Florence Ware (1891-1971, American
Untitled (Landscape)
Oil on canvas board
Gift of Mr. and Mrs. Joseph J. Palmer
Museum #1991.069.026
 
Daughter of Walter E. Ware, one of Utah's leading architects, Florence Ware studied art at the University of Utah and the Chicago Art Institute. One of the few artists in Utah to receive a Federal Art Project commission during the 1930s, her government sponsored murals in Kingsbury Hall are evidence of her high level of technical skill as well as her strong sense of pattern and design. Her sensitively painted views of local subjects demonstrate the depth of her understanding of the conventions that govern landscape painting. This painting is an example of Ware's ability to reveal the characteristics of a local scene in small, intimate scale and with controlled color relationships.
 
LeConte Stewart (1891-1990), American
Smith's House, 1937
Oil on canvas
Gift of Kay H. Blood
Museum #2001.16/2
 
LeConte Stewart never studied in Europe and consciously avoided modernist tendencies to abstract and distort forms and colors. His work records the qualities of Utah's changing landscape now altered by the effects of mechanization and industrialization. Painted in 1937, Smith's House is a straightforward painting of an abandoned Victorian-style house. Railroad tracks in the foreground parallel electrical power lines above the house. One of the New Deal programs of the 1930s was to bring electrical power to rural communities, thereby creating jobs and stabilizing local economies. But even that optimistic sign doesn't change the feeling of desolation and loneliness the painting conveys. As with most of Stewart's paintings, there are no people pictured; his landscapes are uninhabited and most of his houses appear unoccupied. Stewart found endless inspiration in the Utah's material emptiness during the 1920s and 1930s.
 
Panel III: 16" x 20"
 
 

An Organized Community

 
 
Plat of the City of Zion: Photo 910 27774 Courtesy of the Utah State Historical Society.
 
Utah's early immigrants represented different reasons for settling the region. Mormon pioneers wanted a secluded, uninhabited space in which they could establish organized towns based on Joseph Smith's design for the City of Zion. In contrast, the diverse groups of non-Mormon settlers, shared no common belief system, and none had plans for a utopian metropolis in the wilderness. Ethnic groups formed enclaves with their own churches, lodges, and meeting places.
 
While Mormons envisioned a religious settlement based on agriculture, most non-Mormon immigrants were drawn to the area by the economic potential of abundant coal, silver, gold, copper and other mineral resources. The disparate purposes of the two main groups of early arrivals combined to create the unique economic and cultural environment. As civic, devotional, and domestic buildings competed for attention with the surrounding mountains, artists confronted the problem of incorporating geometric architectural shapes into the organic forms of nature without compromising the integrity of either.
 
 
 
Bird's Eye View of Salt Lake City 1870: Photo 910 17851 courtesy of the Utah State Historical Society
 
 
Danquart Anthon Weggeland (1827-1918), American, Norwegian born
Manti Temple, 1884
Gift of Mr. and Mrs. Joseph J. Palmer
Oil on panel
Museum # 1991.069.027
 
Label:
 
Religious buildings were the costliest and most complex structures built by early settlers. The Salt Lake Temple, a Gothic Revival design by Truman O. Angell and William Folsom, was begun in 1853 and completed forty years later. While completion of the Salt Lake Temple lagged, smaller temples were completed by the late 1880s in St. George, Logan, and Manti, shown in this painting.
 
The Cathedral Church of St. Mark, designed by Richard Upjohn, Jr., was completed in 1871, and the Cathedral of the Madeleine, designed by Karl Neuhausen and Bernard Mecklenburg in the Romanesque Revival style was begun in 1899 and completed in 1909.
 
Panel IV: 16" x 20"
 
 

Economic Beginnings

 
 
Inside the Blacksmith's Shop: Photo P0061 courtesy of the J. Willard Marriott Library, University of Utah
 
Utah's economy developed in stages, beginning with agriculture, then mining, and finally supported by manufacturing in the late nineteenth century. Mormon settlers shared an ideology in favor of a balanced economy supported primarily by agriculture, but they acknowledged the need to establish systems for resource development, trade, and manufacturing.
 
The Mormon plan for a self-sustaining society included local manufacturing that provided markets for Utah's agricultural products. The Department of Public Work established in 1850, supported such industries as a sugar factory, machine shop, foundry, and nail factory. Small local establishments provided the community's basic needs: sawmills, gristmills, tanneries, and carpenter shops, all designed as cooperative programs. Cooperative light industries, including tanneries, textile mills, tin shops, and broom factories, produced goods for the local population.
 
James T. Harwood (1860-1940), American
Old Blacksmith Shop, City Creek Canyon
Oil on canvas
On loan courtesy of the Museum of Church History and Art
 
Label:
 
In 1852 John Taylor brought machinery, sugar beet seeds, and experienced workers from Europe to manufacture beet sugar. The plant failed to produce sugar, and Brigham Young assumed control of the company. He first established a factory at Temple Square, then on a church farm four miles south of the city known since as Sugar House. The three-story adobe factory, completed in 1855, processed more than 22,000 sugar beets into molasses that proved unpalatable. An infestation of the sugar beet crops of 1855 and 1856 by grasshoppers forced the factory to close.
 
Danquart Anthon Weggeland (1827-1918), American, Norwegian born
Sugar Factory at Sugarhouse
Oil on canvas
On loan courtesy of the Museum of Church History and Ar
 
Sugar Factory at Sugarhouse: Photo Courtesy of the Utah State Historical Society
 
Art near Panel V:
Albert Mugleston (1885-1965), American
Big Cottonwood Paper Mill
On loan courtesy of the Museum of Church History and Art
 
 
The Old Paper Mill at Big Cottonwood Canyon: Photo P0110#61 Courtesy Photo Archives, J. Willard Marriott Library, University of Utah
 
Orson D. Campbell (1876-1933), American
The Old Mill, 1929
Oil on panel
Gift of Henry and Salome Oberhansley
Museum #1985.025.005
 
Bent Franklin Larsen
Sawmill Provo Canyon
Oil on canvas
Gift of William Patrick
Museum # 1971.040.002.001
 
James T. Harwood (1860-1940), American
Old Blacksmith Shop (date) (from State Street and North Temple)
On loan courtesy of the Museum of Church History and Art
 
This crudely constructed utilitarian building shows clear evidence of the artist's ability to render closely observed effects of light and climate. Harwood's instruction at the Académie Julian and the Ecole des Beaux Arts in Paris
enabled him to develop a high level of technical skill and a sharp sense of literal accuracy. The Old Blacksmith Shop is placed, somewhat improbably, in a sunlit landscape that reminds viewers that Harwood's training combined rigorous academic studio instruction with the freedom of plein-air (on-site) painting.
 
LeConte Stewart (1891-1990), American
The Green Front, 1935
Oil on canvas
University of Utah Collection
Museum # X.037
 
Waldo Park Midgley (1888-1986), American
Second South and Main, 1905
Oil on panel
Purchased with funds from Friends of the Art Museum
Museum #1984.091
Danquart Anthon Weggeland (1827-1918), American, Norwegian born
Armstrong Ranch, Mountain Dell, ca. 1890
Oil on canvas
Loaned by a private collector
 
Francis Horspool (1871-1951), American
Wells Fargo Stage Station at Willow Springs, 1939
Oil on canvas
Purchased with funds from Friends of the Art Museum
Museum #1978.487
 
 
Panel VI: 16" x 20":
 

Camp Douglas

Fort Douglas Photo 623-3004 Courtesy of the Utah State Historical Society

 
 
Camp Douglas, at Salt lake City, recently reinforced by United States Troops: Photo of lithograph courtesy of the Utah State Historical Society
 
In May of 1862 the Third Regiment of the California Infantry was sent to Great Salt Lake in the Utah Territory ostensibly to protect the overland mail route from attacks by hostile Indians. The 750 troops of the Regiment were under the command of Colonel Patrick E. Connor who had fought with the Texas Volunteers in the War with Mexico. Then, as a civilian, he moved to Stockton, California to establish a construction business. When President Abraham Lincoln asked California to raise five infantry regiments and one cavalry unit, Connor enlisted, accepted a commission as Colonel of the Third Regiment, and recruited many of his troops from the gold mining camps in the Stockton area.
 
In Utah, Connor established Camp Douglas, naming it for Senator Stephen A Douglas, a fellow Democrat, who had died the previous year. Connor and the California volunteers founded the Union Vedette, a newspaper intended to attract a "new, hardy and industrious population" to Utah with its "rich veins of gold, silver, copper, and other minerals." The recruits from the gold mining camps in California enthusiastically followed their commander's orders to prospect for precious metals when it did not interfere with their military duties. The military population also supported non-Mormon businesses that were expanding mining and prospecting activities in the area.
 
Painting near Panel V:
 
George M. Ottinger (1833-1917), American
Above Camp Douglas, 1868
Oil on canvas
On loan from the Springville Museum of Art, Springville, Utah
 
Panel V, 16" x 20"
 
Utah's economy developed in stages, beginning with agriculture, supplemented by mining in the 1870s and, finally supported by manufacturing in the late years of the nineteenth-century. While economies of neighboring states depended largely on mining, Utah's early Mormon settlers were motivated by a shared ideology that favored a balanced development supported primarily by agriculture. At the same time, they confronted the problem of establishing systems of resource development, trade, and manufacturing. The resource most critical to an agricultural economy was water; the first settlements were founded where streams of water could be diverted to provide effective irrigation.
 
Local industries, supported by the Department of Public Work established in 1850, included the ill-fated sugar factory, a machine shop, a foundry, and a nail factory. Small local establishments served the community's basic needs: sawmills, gristmills, tanneries, and carpenter shops, all designed as cooperative programs. Light industries, including tanneries, textile mills, tin shops, and broom factories, produced needed goods for the local population.
 

 

Mining in the Area

 
 
Park City: Photograph 2844 courtesy of the Utah State Historical Society
 
Although Brigham Young exhorted his followers to concentrate on the "wealth produced by farms and ranches, the lumber from our saw-mills and the rocks from our quarries," he recognized the obvious economic potential of coal, iron, and precious metals. With the discovery of silver in the Bingham Canyon, and gold, silver, lead, and copper in other locations, Utah's economy was re-shaped. The random character of mining communities altered the landscape in ways that differed from the coherent grid design of Mormon settlements. Limitations imposed by steep terrain and the needs of a diverse population of mill and mine workers and families defined the patterns in which homes and businesses were built.
 
Waldo Park Midgley (1888-1986), American
View of Park City, 1924
Oil on canvas
On loan from the Springville Museum of Art, Springville, Utah
 
Panel VI: 16" x 20"
 
 

Utah State Prison

 

 
Utah State Penitentiary at Sugar House: Photo 925.6.6138 courtesy of the Utah State Historical Society
 
The first prison in the Utah Territory was built in 1854 on a site selected by Brigham Young to house criminals who broke federal laws. Located six miles from the center of Salt Lake City, the original prison consisted of 16 cells dug into the ground and covered with iron bars. Later an adobe wall enclosing a dining room and meeting hall was added. Sir Richard Burton described the prison in 1860 as "a somewhat oriental-looking building, with a large quadrangle behind the house, guarded by a wall with a walk on the summit and pepper-caster sentry boxes at each angle."
 
Conditions in the poorly ventilated cells were so bad that women prisoners were originally confined in the warden's house on the premises. A lack of guards accounted for the escape rate of 20%, requiring establishment of more rigorous rules when the prison was turned over to the U.S. Marshal. Because the eight hundred convicted polygamists who were imprisoned in the Sugar House facility from the mid 1880s through the early 1890s spent so much of their time reading, a prison library was established.
 
 
Art near Panel V:
 
Francis M. Treseder (1853-1923), American
Utah Territorial Prison, 1886
Oil on canvas
Purchased with funds from Friends of the Art Museum
Museum #1982.008
 
 

Views of Utah from Outside the State

 

 
In addition to the settlers, various travelers and temporary residents also contributed to the region's developing character. These included members of government sponsored survey expeditions, military personnel, gold seekers, reporters and illustrators for national and international publications, and travelers on their way to California. Their perceptions and observations of the area and its settlers add an important dimension to the record of Utah's cultural development.
 
In 1849 Captain Howard Stansbury received orders to explore along the Platte River Trail and due west across the Wasatch Mountains to Salt Lake City. Stansbury's report contributed to the accumulating information essential for locating the transcontinental railroad route. His survey report included appendixes with illustrations, including several tinted lithographs of the area around the Great Salt Lake.
 
Ackerman Lithography (BR Ackerman, Lith. 379 Broadway, NY
First View of the Great Salt Lake Valley from a Mountain Pass
Hand colored lithograph on paper
Purchased with funds from Friends of the Art Museum
Museum # 1971.016.007.002
 
Ackerman Lithography (BR Ackerman, Lith. 379 Broadway, NY)
Bowery Mint and the President's House Great Salt Lake
Hand colored lithograph on paper
Purchased with funds from Friends of the Art Museum
Museum #1971.016.007.003
 
Ackerman Lithography (BR Ackerman, Lith. 379 Broadway, NY)
Fort Utah Valley of the Great Salt Lake
Hand colored lithograph on paper
Purchased with funds from Friends of the Art Museum
Museum #1971.016.007.004
 
Ackerman Lithography (BR Ackerman, Lith. 379 Broadway, NY)
Street in Great Salt Lake Valley Looking East
Hand colored lithograph on paper
Purchased with funds from Friends of the Art Museum
Museum #1971.016.007.005
 
F.C. Grist, John Hudson and others from Captain Howard Stansbury's An Expedition to the Valley of the Great Salt Lake of Utah. Philadelphia: Lippincott, Grambo & Co., 1852.
Tissandier label:
 
Trained in the architecture program of the Ecolé des Beaux Arts in Paris, Albert Tissandier embarked on a six month long journey across the United States in 1885 to document his impressions of American architectural and engineering achievements. His meticulous drawings were published in Le Monde and La Nature, publications that contributed to the growing tourist industry. As his journey took him to Western territories, he turned his attention to the power of nature and produced intricately detailed and controlled drawings of mountains, canyons, and desert environments.
 
This drawing of the Great Salt Lake shows the bathing establishment at Black Rock that included changing rooms, observation decks, a restaurant, picnic tables, and a dock for swimmers. Captivated by the desolate feeling of the ancient lake in the midst of a desert, Tissandier wrote: "It is impossible to dream of anything more poetic than this lake." He noted that the shores were "verdant and covered in flowers we in France would conserve as rarities" and went on to observe that there were also some "primitive" establishments installed for visiting tourists and bathers.
 
Albert Tissandier (1839-1906) French
Steamer at Bathing Pier, 1885
Pencil drawing
Purchased with funds from Friends of the Art Museum
Museum # 1978.237
 
Albert Tissandier (1839-1906), French
Bathing Establishment on the Salt Lake, 1885
Pencil drawing
Purchased with funds from Friends of the Art Museum
Museum # 1978.238
 
Salt Lake City: Four bird's eye views
Illustration/wood engraving
From The Graphic, December 9, 1871
Museum # 1997.14.23
 
 
The Union Pacific Railway
Illustration/wood engraving
The Illustrated London News, August 7, 1869
Museum # 1997.14.26
 
Currier & Ives
Great Salt Lake, Utah, ca. 1870
Hand colored lithograph
Museum # 1976.100
 
© Mary Francey 2007
 

 

 

 

 

(above: Herman H. Haag (1871-1895), American, First Building in Utah. On loan from the Museum of Church History and Art)

 

 

 

 

(above: Carl Christian Anton Christensen (1831-1912), American, Danish born, Home Sweet Home, 1875, Oil on panel. Gift of Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Palmer. Museum #1991.069.009)

 

 

 

 

(above: Orson D. Campbell (1876-1933), American, The Old Mill, 1929, Oil on panel. Gift of Henry and Salome Oberhansley. Museum # 1985.025.005)

 

 

 

 

(above: LeConte Stewart (1891-1990), American, The Green Front, 1935, Oil on canvas. University of Utah Collection. Museum # X.037)

 

 

 

 

(above: Waldo Park Midgley (1888-1986), American, Second South and Main, 1905, Oil on panel. Purchased with funds from Friends of the Art Museum. Museum #1984.091)

 

 

 

 

(above: George M. Ottinger (1833-1917), American, Above Camp Douglas, 1868, Oil on canvas. On loan from the Springville Museum of Art, Springville, Utah)

 

 

 

 

(above: Francis M. Treseder (1853-1923), American, Utah Territorial Prison, 1886, Oil on canvas Purchased with funds from Friends of the Art Museum. Museum #1982.008)

Editor's note:

Resource Library wishes to extend appreciation to Mary F. Francey, Ph.D, Curator of American Art, Professor of Art History, Utah Museum of Fine Arts for her help concerning the above text.

 

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