Shepard Alonzo Mount

by Deborah J. Johnson

 



 

Notes:

1 Henry Gardiner Adams, Flowers: Their Moral, Language and Poetry (Halifax: 1851) 285; Henrietta Dumont, The Language of Flowers (Philadelphia: Peck & Bliss, 1856) 77.

2 Shepard Alonzo Mount (Athens, PA) letter to William Sidney Mount (Stony Brook, LI) 26 September 1841, Buffet ch. 19; and Shepard Alonzo Mount (Athens, PA) letter to William Sidney Mount, 11 September 1841, Buffet ch. 19: "I must stick to that branch of art that afford me the most money -- hence my motive in practicing the portraits at this time."

3 The volcano in nineteenth-century scientific, literary and artistic work is discussed with regard to selected paintings by Frederick Church dating from the 1860s in Katherine Manthorne, Creation & Renewal: Views of Cotapaxi by Frederick Edwin Church (Washington, D.C.: Smithsonian Institution Press, 1985) esp. 10-12 and 31. Also John Wilmerding, "Fire and Ice in American Art," in Kynaston McShine, ed., The Natural Paradise: Painting in America, 1800-1950 (New York: The Museum of Modern Art, 1976) esp. 50.

4 Shepard Alonzo Mount (Factoryville, NY) letter to Noel Joseph Becar, 18 September [1862], The Museums at Stony Brook.

5 Alden J. Spooner, "Reminiscences of Artists, William S. and Shepard A. Mount," Evening Post 16 December 1868: 1.

6 In a discussion of Shepard Mount's Rose of Sharon: "Remember Me," Phoebe Lloyd suggests that the flower symbolism in this work is not as "ambiguous" as that in William Sidney Mount's posthumous portraiture. In actuality, Rose of Sharon: "Remember Me" contains complex layers of personal symbolic reference not found in William Sidney Mount's work. Phoebe Lloyd, "Posthumous Mourning Portraiture," in Martha V. Pike and Janice Gray Armstrong, A Time to Mourn: Expressions of Grief in Nineteenth Century America (Stony Brook, New York: The Museums at Stony Brook, 1980) 75.

7 Frank B. Carpenter, "Abraham Lincoln," The Peterson Magazine 6 (June 1896): 567-573.

 

About the author:

Deborah J. Johnson was the president and chief executive officer of The Museums at Stony Brook at the time of her writing of Shepard Alonzo Mount.

 

Resource Library editor's note:

The above essay is adapted from a catalog essay by Ms. Johnson titled Shepard Alonzo Mount, His Life and Art for the exhibition Shepard Alonzo Mount held in 1998 at the Museums at Stony Brook, now named the Long Island Museum of American Art, History and Carriages.

The essay was reprinted, without illustrations, in Resource Library on December 9, 2005 with the permission of the author and the Long Island Museum of American Art, History and Carriages. If you have questions or comments regarding the essay, please contact the Long Island Museum of American Art, History and Carriages directly through either this phone number or web address:

This essay was previously published in American Art Review, Volume X Number 3, May - June, 1998, pp. 116-121..

Resource Library wishes to extend appreciation to Ms. Eva Greguski of the Long Island Museum of American Art, History and Carriages for help in connection with reprinting of this essay. Readers may also enjoy these earlier articles:

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