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Seeing the Unseen: Photographs by Harold E. Edgerton

March 6 - May 1, 2005

 

Seeing the Unseen: Photographs by Harold E. Edgerton , a special exhibition of photographs by the world famous scientist, Dr. Harold E. Edgerton, opened March 6, 2005 in the Visual Arts Center at the Washington Pavilion.

Dr. Harold E. Edgerton was one of the most significant inventors of the 20th century. Among his inventions was the strobe light, a fast-blinking electronic light that seemed to make moving objects stand still. Edgerton's achievements in stroboscopic and ultra-high-speed photography are illustrated in books that tell the history of photography as well as in science textbooks. His pioneering research laid the foundation for the development of many modern technologies and electronic devices.

Harold Edgerton was an educator as well as an artist. He taught at The Massachusetts Institute of Technology from 1927 until his death in 1990, and he was famous for his enthusiastic and enjoyable demonstration lectures. His photographs did more than simply record objective facts for his research; Edgerton took great pleasure from his creatively inventive photography. He had an artist's eye for the aesthetics of composition, and he had a quirky attitude toward the imagery that he depicted. Edgerton had fun with his photography, and he enjoyed sharing the fun, as well as the knowledge, with others. Edgerton focused upon imagery that would inspire a sense of wonder in viewers. His photographs seem to wave a magic wand that stops time and captures realities that are otherwise impossible for people to see or comprehend. (right: Milk Drop Coronet, 1957, chromographic development process. Copyright Estate of Harold E. Edgerton)

Edgerton's amazing high-speed photography blurs the lines between art and science. His scientific experiments and inventive photography offer the Washington Pavilion of Arts and Science an opportunity to organize a special Pavilion-wide theme of exhibits and events. Seeing the Unseen: Photographs by Harold E. Edgerton is being presented in coordination with the exhibition, Seeing the Unseen: the Interactive Experience at the Kirby Science and Discovery Center. Visitors to the Kirby Science and Discovery Center have the hands-on opportunity to replicate several of the images seen in this photography exhibition.

The exhibits form a part of the Pavilion-wide Extreme Action Festival. March 12, Extreme Action Saturday, marks the opening of the photography exhibit. Special activities, lectures and events will also be held that day throughout the Washington Pavilion. A reception in the Visual Arts Center for Seeing the Unseen: Photographs by Harold E. Edgerton will also be held on Saturday, March 12, from 12 noon-4 p.m. with Michael Derr, Executive Director of the Edgerton Explorit Center. Mr. Derr will speak at 1 p.m. and 3 p.m. about Dr. Edgerton's life.

Seeing the Unseen: Photographs by Harold E. Edgerton was organized by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology Museum and by Smith Kramer Fine Art Services. All of the photographs in the exhibit are Copyright Estate of Harold E. Edgerton. (right: Cutting the Card Quickly, 1965, chromographic development process. Copyright Estate of Harold E. Edgerton)

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About the Washington Pavilion of Arts and Science

The Washington Pavilion of Arts and Science, located in historic downtown Sioux Falls, South Dakota. 301 S. Main Avenue, 57104, is the Sioux Falls region's premiere entertainment, cultural and educational facility. The Washington Pavilion features the Visual Arts Center, Kirby Science Discovery Center, Wells Fargo CineDome Theater and Husby Performing Arts Center all under one roof. Please see Washington Pavilion of Arts and Science website for hours and fees.

 

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Copyright 2005 Traditional Fine Arts Organization, Inc., an Arizona nonprofit corporation. All rights reserved.