Hudson River Museum

Yonkers, New York

914.963.4550

Photo: Quesada/Burke



 

Singular Voices/Voices of Many: Photographs from the Sixties by James Hinton

 

"Singular Voices/Voices of Many: Photographs from the Sixties by James Hinton," opens at The Hudson River Museum on January 14, 2000 and runs through May 21, 2000.

This selection of 45 silver gelatin prints, each of which measure 16 by 20 inches, and five mural-sized images, weaves together the cultural and political life of African Americans in the 1960s; the rallies, public appearances, leaders, signs and symbols that grew out of the Civil Rights Movement. His impressive body of work not only includes important leaders of the day, but also offers a moving profile of ordinary people whose lives were impacted during these times. (left: Untitled (Ms. Myrlie Evers and children), 1963, Chicago, black and white silver gelatin print, 16 x 20 inches, Collection of the artist, © James E. Hinton)

"The poignant black and white photographs of James Hinton offer both a first-hand account and personal perspective of the 1960s - a period of great struggle, tumult and consequence for all who experienced the decade," said Museum Director Philip Verre who curated the exhibition, "His work as a freelance photographer tells the story of all African Americans as seen through the routines of daily existence, rallies, street activities, intimate portraitures and leading personalities of the times."

Hinton captures the natural eloquence of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., the bravado of Muhammad Ali, the grace of Mahalia Jackson, the self confidence of H. Rap Brown, and the quiet strength of Myrlie Evers. Equally impressive are his street scenes and portraits of children, mothers, fathers and the elderly who appear as participants, victims or curious bystanders. (left: Untitled (Rural Mississippi child worker), 1969, black and white silver gelatin print, 16 x 20 inches, Collection of the artist, © James E. Hinton)

Most of the photographer's images come from Chicago and Harlem, but he also chronicled events in Atlanta, Mississippi and California. Additionally, his oeuvre includes images of public demonstrations both for and against the war in Vietnam at a time when this conflict became more directly connected to the Civil Rights Movement.

"Collectively, the work of James Hinton speaks personally and poignantly of a complex and troubled period in American history," Verre said.

James E. Hinton exhibited his work as early as 1963, trained at the highly regarded Kamonge photography workshop for African Americans in New York in 1965, and photographed for black-issue news and television programs before turning to a successful career in commercial film production in the late 1960s. In 1998, 11 of the photographer's images were acquired by the Library of Congress, adding to its significant photo archives of the Civil Rights Movement. A long-time resident of Dobbs Ferry, N.Y., Hinton currently teaches film making at Purchase College.

"Singular Voices/Voices of Many: Photographs from the Sixties by James Hinton" is generously sponsored by Heineken USA, Inc.

Read more in Resource Library Magazine about the Hudson River Museum.

 

rev. 11/26/10


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