Military Art: WWII

Online information about American military art from sources other than Resource Library

 



 

American Artists in Uniform, World War II Experience from Brown University. Accessed August, 2015.

Ansel Adams's Photographs of Japanese-American Internment at Manzanar is a collection from the Library of Congress, which says:" Although a majority of the more than 200 photographs are portraits, the images also include views of daily life, agricultural scenes, and sports and leisure activities... When offering the collection to the Library in 1965, Adams said in a letter, "The purpose of my work was to show how these people, suffering under a great injustice, and loss of property, businesses and professions, had overcome the sense of defeat and dispair [sic] by building for themselves a vital community in an arid (but magnificent) environment...." Accessed 11/16

Arthur Szyk: Soldier in Art is a 2017 exhibit at the New-York Historical Society which says: "Arthur Szyk, the great 20th-century activist in art, confronted the turbulent, hate-filled period with forceful artistic depictions caricaturing Hitler, Mussolini, and Hirohito as the evil architects of their regimes' destructive and inhumane policies."  Accessed 11/17

Camouflage Rhythms: Artwork by Juliette May Fraser is a 2017 exhibit at the Honolulu Museum of Art which says: "Camouflage Rhythms: Artwork by Juliette May Fraser features oil and watercolor paintings created by Fraser during World War II when she worked side-by-side with lei sellers making camouflage nets for the Army Corps of Engineers. Artists such as Fraser were recruited for their acumen with color, composition, and the painting and dyeing process." Also see Wikipedia entry. Accessed 5/17

Combat Artists of World War II from PBS. Accessed August, 2015.

HOW TO KILL: WORLD WAR II WATERCOLORS BY ROBERT ANDREW PARKER is a 2015 exhibit at the Arkansas Arts Center which says: "In the war images violence is stranded in vast landscapes, gun scopes isolate men out, and empty space surrounds post-battle debris. Death is the final coda on disconnection, the ultimate severance of man from the world. The effect is bleak but not cold. Parker's color dims but is not harsh, his line wavers at its most agitated but never turns jagged. His refusal to grate has the effect of gentleness, a remembrance that is both tender and clear eyed." Accessed 2/17

Lima Company Memorial at Ohio Statehouse. Accessed August, 2015.

Military Aircraft Nose Art from University of Arizona and Dr. James S. Griffith. Accessed August, 2015.

Naval Art of Thomas Hart Benton from the Navy Art Collection (WWII) Accessed August, 2015.

Philip Guston and Iowa is a 2017 exhibit at the University of Iowa Museum of Art which says: "This special presentation of 12 works by Philip Guston in the UIMA collection emphasizes the renowned artist's production during the three and a half year period he was a (State) University of Iowa painting and drawing instructor and visiting artist (Fall 1941-Spring 1945). " Also see more on the artist from the museum.  Accessed 9/17

Posters and Patriotism: Selling World War I in New York is a 2017 exhibit at the Museum of the City of New York which says: "When the United States entered World War I in April 1917, New York City's artists and illustrators were enlisted in the war effort.  Many of them worked for the federal government's new Division of Pictorial Publicity. Posters and Patriotism: Selling World War I in New York examines the outpouring of posters, flyers, magazine art, sheet music covers, and other mass-produced images created by these New Yorkers to stir the American public to wartime loyalty, duty, and sacrifice." Also see 4/6/17 Reuters article.  Accessed 5/17

Thomas Hart Benton and the Navy is a 2017 exhibit at the Chrysler Museum of Art which says: "A heroic period in American history as captured by one of the quintessential American painters of the era: That's the story with Thomas Hart Benton and the Navy, an exhibition of steel, smoke, saltwater, and sinew all captured in a signature style." Accessed 6/17

U.S. Naval Art of Arthur Beaumont from Arthur Beaumont Naval Art Website. Accessed August, 2015.

 

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