2009 Resource Library articles and essays with the topic "African-American Art"

 




Deep Sea: Drawings by William O. Golding (12/10/09) Deep Sea is an exhibition at the Morris Museum of Art of twenty-nine remarkable maritime drawings by self-taught African-American artist William O. Golding (1874-1943). Shanghaied from the Savannah waterfront when he was eight years old, William O. Golding chronicled his travels world-wide through drawings that he created near the end of his life while a patient at the U.S. Marine Hospital in Savannah. Between 1932 and 1939, he executed approximately sixty drawings, literally drawn from his memories of the ships on which he sailed and the ports he visited around the globe.

The Mural Tradition; essay by Edmund Barry Gaither (8/5/09) This essay appeared in the catalogue to the exhibition A Shared Heritage: Art by Four African Americans, which was on view at the Indianapolis Museum of Art (February 25 - April 21, 1996); Terra Museum of American Art, Chicago (May 11 - July 6, 1996); Museum of the National Center of Afro-American Artists, Boston (September 23 - November 30, 1996); and Hunter Museum of Art, Chattanooga (January 19 - March 2, 1997).

Image and Identity: The Art of William E. Scott, John W. Hardrick, and Hale A. Woodruff; essay by Harriet G. Warkel (7/27/09) This essay appeared in the catalogue to the exhibition A Shared Heritage: Art by Four African Americans, which was on view at the Indianapolis Museum of Art (February 25 - April 21, 1996); Terra Museum of American Art, Chicago (May 11 - July 6, 1996); Museum of the National Center of Afro-American Artists, Boston (September 23 - November 30, 1996); and Hunter Museum of Art, Chattanooga (January 19 - March 2, 1997).

Barkley L. Hendricks: Birth of the Cool, Paintings 1964-2007 (6/3/09) Bringing to mind American realism, pop culture, Renaissance portraiture, and post-modernism in a way uniquely his own, Hendricks' pioneering contributions to American portraiture and conceptualism claim a compelling space somewhere between portraitists Chuck Close and Alex Katz, and black conceptualists David Hammons and Adrian Piper. Hendricks' groundbreaking body of work has both influenced and paved the way for many of today's generation of artists. Hendricks' bold portrayal of his subject's attitude and style elevates the common person to celebrity status. At times cool, at times confrontational, sometimes sexually charged, and always empowering, Hendricks' large-scale portraiture reveals the artist's keen eye for his subject's attire, spirit, and point of view. Article includes checklist.

The African American Image in Virginia (3/11/09) When you think about all the pictures, portraits, drawings, or paintings of African Americans you have seen, have you ever thought about what those depictions convey about the subjects, or about the race as a whole?  Can you tell the difference between an image of an African American created by a white person or a black person?  Does the artist seem sympathetic, neutral, or demeaning toward the African American(s) depicted? In this Virginia Historical Society exhibition, various media are explored to show how images of blacks have changed throughout Virginia's history.  The nearly fifty images on display -- from books, sheet music, newspapers, broadsides, photographs, and works of art -- show visitors the way whites and blacks have depicted African Americans.

A Force for Change: African American Art and the Julius Rosenwald Fund (3/5/09) From 1928 to 1948, the Rosenwald Fund's Fellowship Program awarded stipends to hundreds of African American artists, writers, teachers, and scholars -- many with ties to Chicago -- as well as white southerners with an interest in race relations. Among the impressive list of Rosenwald Fellows were some of the leading artists of the decades between the two world wars, and the work they produced with Rosenwald support was made under conditions of exceptional artistic security and freedom. The work of these artists, such as Elizabeth Catlett, Eldzier Cortor, Aaron Douglas, Jacob Lawrence, Gordon Parks, Marion Perkins, Rose Piper, Augusta Savage, and Charles White, is the focus of A Force for Change.

Harlem Renaissance (3/5/09) Organized by the Oklahoma City Museum of Art, Harlem Renaissance included more than 100 paintings, sculptures, and photographs by artists such as Richmond Barthé, Aaron Douglas, Palmer Hayden, William H. Johnson, Malvin Gray Johnson, Jacob Lawrence, Archibald J. Motley Jr., James VanDerZee, and others. Organized thematically, Harlem Renaissance explored a number of subjects, including Harlem as a literary center, portraiture and the "New Negro," life in Paris and abroad, the influence of European modernism and African art, as well as images related to daily life, African American history, and the South. The exhibition also examined the idea of Harlem and the Harlem Renaissance as a later artistic subject, through works by Romare Bearden and Faith Ringgold. 

Labor and Leisure: Works by African-American Artists from the Permanent Collection of the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts (3/5/09) "Labor and Leisure explored the polarities of daily life for American blacks in a variety of media. Included was art by James VanDerZee (1886-1983), Leslie Garland Bolling (1898-1955), Jacob Lawrence (1917-2000), Romare Bearden (1911-1988), Charles White (1918-1979), Lorna Simpson (born 1960) and Willie Cole (born 1955). The exhibition focused on African-American art from the time of the Harlem Renaissance in the 1920s and 1930s to the Postmodern experimentation of the late1990s.

Confronting History: Contemporary Artists Envision the Past (2/11/09) Organized by Middlebury College Museum of Art around the gift to the museum of Kara Walker's 2005 Harper's Illustrated History of the Civil War (Annotated), a portfolio of 15 offset lithographs and silk screen prints donated by Richard and Kathy Fuld (Middlebury Parents, 2003 and 2007), the exhibition features artists who use the print medium to revisit and reinterpret historical conflicts. The works on view, all based on printed sources that the artists readily acknowledge, demonstrate a rich mix of contemporary printmaking strategies and techniques. Many address themselves to the issue of race, and the exhibition explores that general topic in historical perspective, ranging from the Age of Enlightenment to the present day.

African American Images and Artists from the Swope Collection (2/5/09) How artistic perspective and audience reception change with the times is illustrated in African American Images and Artists from the Swope Collection. In striking contrast are a painting by John McCrady (Canton, Mississippi 1911-1968), a regionalist from the agricultural south of the 1940s, and a sculpture by Richard Hunt (born Chicago, Illinois 1935-), an abstract expressionist from the industrial north of the 1960s.

 

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