Editor's note: The Delaware Art Museum provided source material to Resource Library for the following article. If you have questions or comments regarding the source material, please contact the Delaware Art Museum directly through either this phone number or web address:



 

Edward Koren: The Capricious Line

June 25 - September 18, 2016

 

The Delaware Art Museum presents Edward Koren: The Capricious Line, on view June 25 - September 18, 2016. This exhibition celebrates the five-decade career of renowned cartoonist and long-standing contributor to The New Yorker Edward Koren (born 1935) and features approximately 50 original drawings, many on display for the first time.

Koren's cartoons encompass an eclectic set of themes which he tackles with his wry, astute criticism. With over 1,000 cartoons published in The New Yorker since 1962, Koren's distinctive style and relatable characters deftly articulate the neuroses of contemporary society. Touching on a diverse set of issues ranging from parenting to man's relationship to nature, Koren creates brief moments that portray man's awkward rapport with the world around us. In contrast to other cartoonists' political caricatures, Koren's decidedly non-confrontational tone uses psychological acuteness and philosophical provocation to elicit laughs and stimulate thought.

"The exhibition complements the Museum's extensive holdings of American illustration from the late 19th and early 20th centuries, which are also on view in the permanent collection galleries," says Mary F. Holahan, Curator of Illustration/Curator of Outlooks Exhibitions. "The Capricious Line not only honors the accomplishments of this beloved cartoonist but also asserts his status as an artist."

The full-scale, heavyweight ink drawings which have, up until now, been experienced only as postcard sized images in the pages of the The New Yorker highlight Koren's mastery of drawing. Koren's art is all about drawing and the imaginative worlds it can unveil and record. Through this impressive collection of works, Koren shares the sheer fun and joy of drawing with his audiences. These innovative illustrations demonstrate the psychological, philosophical, and comical talents of Koren's pen.

Curated by Diane Fane and David Rosand, this traveling exhibition was developed by the Wallach Art Gallery at Columbia University and organized for tour by International Arts & Artists, Washington D.C. The exhibition will tour at Syracuse University Art Galleries, Syracuse, NY from October 28, 2016 - December 23, 2016. For an updated tour schedule, click here.

 

About Edward Koren (born 1935)

Born in New York City, Koren attended the Horace Mann School and Columbia University. He completed graduate work in etching and engraving with S.W. Hayter at Atelier 17 in Paris, and received an M.F.A. degree from the Pratt Institute. Koren pursued his love of cartooning while on the faculty of Brown University.

Edward Koren received a Doctor of Humane Letters Degree from Union College, and was a John Simon Guggenheim Fellow. In 2003 he was appointed Distinguished Visitor at The American Academy in Berlin, Germany. In 2007 he received The Vermont Governor's Award for Excellence in the Arts. For over 24 years, he has actively participated in the Brookfield, VT, Volunteer Fire Department. He lives in Vermont with his family.

 

Sponsors and Organizers

In Delaware, this exhibition is made possible by the Hallie Tybout Exhibit Fund. Support is provided, in part, by a grant from the Delaware Division of the Arts, a state agency, in partnership with the National Endowment for the Arts. The Division promotes Delaware arts events on www.DelawareScene.com.

Edward Koren: The Capricious Line is curated by Diane Fane and David Rosand, developed by the Miriam and Ira D. Wallach Gallery, New York, and organized for tour by International Arts & Artists, Washington, DC. International Arts and Artists in Washington, DC, is a non-profit arts service organization dedicated to increasing cross-cultural understanding and exposure to the arts internationally through exhibtions, programs and services to artists, art institutions and the public. Visit www.artsandartists.org.

 

Wall text

Ca-pri-cious

adjective: changing often and quickly; not possible to predict; whimsical.

Celebrating five-decades of the career of renowned cartoonist and graphic satirist Edward Koren, this exhibition presents works drawn from more than 1,000 covers and cartoons published in The New Yorker.

Koren's art addresses diverse social, cultural, and environmental issues. Straddling the worlds of the imagination and of the brutal, often hilarious, banality of everyday life allows Koren to flourish in his role as society's keen observer and sharp critic. In contrast to other cartoonists' aggressively political caricatures, Koren's decidedly non-confrontational tone relies on psychological acuteness and philosophical provocation to elicit laughs and stimulate thought.

This exhibition not only honors the accomplishments of Koren as a beloved cartoonist but also demonstrates his skill as an artist. The full-scale drawings, which until now have been experienced only as postcard-sized images in the pages of The New Yorker, showcase his mastery of illustration and his commend of comedic understatement.

Koren's art is all about drawing -- and the imaginative worlds it can unveil and record. Through this impressive collection of works, Koren shares the sheer fun and joy of drawing. His "capricious line," in its lively form and spontaneous mood, articulates the neuroses of contemporary society with a distinctive style, relatable characters, and wry criticism.

 

Catalogue

DMA says: "Edward Koren is best known for his cartoons and covers for The New Yorker magazine. This book explores the full range of the art he has produced during the past five decades: original drawings for cartoons and illustrated books as well as prints and posters. A variety of finished drawings are included­figures that emerged from the commedia dell'arte, fanciful beasts that might occupy a diorama in the American Museum of Natural History, cyclists pedaling through cities and countryside­all documenting the inventive play of the artist's imagination through the motion of his pen or pencil." (right: front cover of Edward Koren: The Capricious Line)

 


Resource Library Editor's note:

To view eight images and caption information for them please visit the museum's page for the exhibition.

Readers may also enjoy:

For definitions of checklist and wall text, please see Definitions in Museums Explained.

Read more information, articles and essays concerning this institutional source by visiting the sub-index page for the Delaware Art Museum in Resource Library.


Search Resource Library for thousands of articles and essays on American art.

Copyright 2016 Traditional Fine Arts Organization, Inc., an Arizona nonprofit corporation. All rights reserved.