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Richard Parrish: Aerial Perspectives of the American Landscape

February 12 - June 19, 2016

 

The Rockwell Museum is hosting a new exhibition, Richard Parrish: Aerial Perspectives of the American Landscape, which opened to the public on February 12, 2016 and will be on view through June 19, 2016. Continuing Parrish's series of "mapping" American glass landscapes, this exhibition will comprise newly kiln-formed glass panels created for public debut in Corning. (right: Richard Parrish. Photo by Rab Cummings - photographer credit from artist's website)

Richard Parrish traveled to Corning from his Montana studio and provided remarks during an opening reception at The Rockwell on Thursday, February 11, 2016. A reception followed his remarks.

Informed by aerial photography, the glass panels provide a birds-eye view of the landscape. Fields, rivers, and crop irrigation patterns are presented in an altered spatial context, while being preserved as recognizable components of the composition. By manipulating the expected vantage point, Parrish controls our engagement with the subject matter and causes us to view the shifting topography of America from a different perspective. Parrish's work serves as a continuation of the rich American landscape tradition.

"As an artist and an architect, I find inspiration in both the natural and the human-made environments. My work investigates the intersections and collisions between the natural landscape and the human impositions on that landscape. It is concerned with both physical and temporal conditions, rooted in the landscape of the intermountain west in the United States."

"The thick panels are comprised of multiple layers of transparent and opaque glass and glass powders that are kiln-formed to create surface relief and texture. The surfaces are ground and cold worked to expose layers in much the same way as the surface of the earth is eroded, graded and cut to expose materials below the surface. The resultant panels evoke images of maps, topography and geology."

 

About Richard Parrish

Richard Parrish is the owner of and designer for Fusio Studio, a studio for kiln-formed glass in Bozeman, Montana.   He holds a Master of Architecture degree from the Cranbrook Academy of Art in Bloomfield Hills, Michigan and a Bachelor of Architecture degree from the University of Idaho in Moscow, Idaho. His work was selected for the Corning Museum of Glass's New Glass Review 27, and he was awarded the American Craft Council Award of Achievement in 2003.  He teaches classes in kiln-formed glass throughout the United States and internationally.

 

(above: Richard Parrish, Bend, 2015, kiln-formed glass, 15 x 24 x .75 inches)

 

Intruductory wall panel text

"As an artist and an architect, I find inspiration in both the natural and the human-made environments. My work investigates the intersections and collisions between the natural landscape and the human impositions on that landscape. It is concerned with both physical and temporal conditions, rooted in the landscape of the intermountain west in the United States."
 
These featured kiln-formed panels by contemporary artist Richard Parrish are the most recent creations in his "Mapping" series. Informed by aerial photography, the panels provide a birds-eye view of the landscape. Fields, rivers, and crop irrigation patterns are presented in an altered spatial context, while being preserved as recognizable components of the composition. By manipulating the expected vantage point, Parrish controls our engagement with the subject matter and causes us to view the shifting topography of America from a different perspective. Parrish's work serves as a continuation of the rich American landscape tradition
 
"The thick panels are comprised of multiple layers of transparent and opaque glass and glass powders that are kilnformed to create surface relief and texture. The surfaces are ground and cold worked to expose layers in much the same way as the surface of the earth is eroded, graded and cut to expose materials below the surface. The resultant panels evoke images of maps, topography and geology."

 


(above: Richard Parrish, Water Line, kiln-formed glass, 48 x 10 x .75 inches)

 

(above: Richard Parrish, Water Way, kiln-formed glass, 32 x 16 x 1 inches)

 

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