Helen Farr Sloan, 1911-2005

by Heather Campbell Coyle



 

Selected images, captions and interpretative text for objects in the exhibition / image set three

 

(above: Helen Farr Sloan (1911-2005), City Street with Elevated Train Track, 1932, Graphite on envelope, 9 7/8 x 15 1/4 inches. Delaware Art Museum, Bequest of Helen Farr Sloan, 2015. © Delaware Art Museum /Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York)

Here, the artist produced a detailed sketch, perhaps used as the basis for a painting or print, on an envelope.

 

(above: Helen Farr Sloan (1911-2005), W.P.A. Theater, c.1935, Oil on board, 22 x 24 inches. Delaware Art Museum, Gift of Kraushaar Galleries in honor of Jerome K. Grossman and his friendship to Helen Farr Sloan, 2007. © Delaware Art Museum /Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York)

During the depths of the Great Depression, from 1935 through 1939, the Works Progress Administration, a government agency created by the New Deal, staged theatrical productions in cities and towns across the United States, providing support for unemployed performers, directors, and musicians. This performance took place in an outdoor theater set up for the summer in Washington Square in New York City.

 

(above: Helen Farr Sloan (1911-2005), Sketchbook, 1935, Sketchbook, graphite and ink on paper, 14 1/2 x 11 1/4 ? 1/4 inches. Delaware Art Museum, Bequest of Helen Farr Sloan, 2014. © Delaware Art Museum /Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York)

This sketch comes from a book containing 28 pages of figure studies and notes, probably from sketching sessions with John Sloan. In his classes at the Art Students League and later in the studio, Helen jotted down notes of things John Sloan said, often on the same pages where she sketched.

 

(above: Helen Farr Sloan (1911-2005), Gallery Scene, c.1938, Oil on board, 22 x 24 inches. Delaware Art Museum, Bequest of Helen Farr Sloan, 2014. © Delaware Art Museum /Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York)

This painting of a crowded opening party depicts a gallery in the Whitney Museum of American Art, then on Eighth Street in New York. The large painting in the back of the room is William Glackens' Family Group, 1910-11, which was shown at the Whitney in 1937 and 1938.

 

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