To See as Artists See: American Art from The Phillips Collection

February 3 - May 6, 2012



 

Information on programs related to the exhibition

 

 
February 3
Curator's Perspective: "Duncan Phillips: Champion of American Art"
Presented by Susan Behrends Frank, Ph.D., The Phillips Collection
Free
 
In this talk, Susan Behrends Frank, Ph.D., associate curator for research at The Phillips Collection and curator of To See as Artists See: American Art from The Phillips Collection, spoke about the extraordinary vision of Duncan Phillips. The collector made an institutional commitment at the end of World War I to champion American art and encourage American artists of independent vision who looked beyond the strictures of the academy at a time when other institutions were unwilling to do so.
 
Founded in Washington, D.C. a decade before the Museum of Modern Art and the Whitney Museum of American Art opened in New York City, The Phillips Collection has championed the very best American art and artists since opening its doors in 1921. For more than 50 years, until his death in 1966, Phillips promoted the work of living American artists, giving them his patronage and encouragement when they needed it the most. In so doing, Phillips, and the museum that carries his name, became a significant force in American modernism, advocating for an American art that could find unity in a diversity of voices.
 
 
February 9
Adult Studio Workshop: Monoprinting
Guest artist: Mark Hosford
Fee.
 
Monoprinting is a process in which painting and printmaking processes are used in combination to create one-of-a-kind, unique works on paper. In this introductory workshop, participants learned the basic process of creating monoprints and monotypes. Participants were given a tour of To See as Artists See: American Art from The Phillips Collection to explore ideas for their own prints and will then head back to the studios to explore a variety of techniques and methods using oil-based inks on Plexiglas.
 
Mark Hosford is also one of the artists whose work is included in the exhibition Fairy Tales, Monsters, and the Genetic Imagination, on view in the Frist Center's Upper-Level Galleries from February 24 through May 28, 2012 and Metamorphoses: Drawings by Erin Anfinson, Kristi Hargrove, Mark Hosford, and Chris Scarborough, on view in the Conte Community Arts Gallery from June 8 through October 28, 2012.
 
 
February 11
Kids Club: Through the Eyes of O'Keeffe
Free.
 
Inspired by the exhibition To See as Artists See: American Art from The Phillips Collection, participants looked closely at objects from nature to create colorful artworks that reflect a larger-than-life scale and the style of American artist Georgia O'Keeffe. Participants created viewfinders to get "up close and personal."
 
 
February 16
Curator's Tour
To See as Artists See: American Art from The Phillips Collection
Free
 
Katie Delmez, curator at the Frist Center, gave a tour that surveys American painting from the late nineteenth through the mid-twentieth century.
 
February 21 and February 25
Educator Workshop
To See as Artists See:
Fee
To See as Artists See: American Art from The Phillips Collection provided an overview of the Phillips's renowned American collection by highlighting more than one hundred paintings by more than 75 American artists. During this full-day workshop, educators examined original works of art on a curator-led tour, participated in studio activities and developed teaching ideas for the classroom. Educators received related resources and teaching materials including sample lesson plans and color art reproductions. Frist Center educator workshops are open to educators of all subjects, pre-K-12.
 
 
February 24
REPaloud: Red by John Logan in collaboration with Tennessee
Free
 
Tennessee Repertory Theatre's REPaloud ("Reading Excellent Plays" aloud) series features contemporary, award-winning dramas in a staged reading format. Winner of the 2010 Tony Award for Best Play, Red paints the vivid picture of master Abstract Expressionist Mark Rothko who has just landed the biggest commission in the history of modern art -- a series of murals for New York's famed Four Seasons Restaurant. In the two fascinating years that follow, Rothko works feverishly with his young assistant, Ken, in his studio on the Bowery. But when Ken gains the confidence to challenge him, Rothko faces the agonizing possibility that his crowning achievement could also become his undoing. Raw and provocative, Red is a searing portrait of an artist's ambition and vulnerability as he tries to create a definitive work for an extraordinary setting.
 
This project has been made possible with the collaboration of the Tennessee Repertory Theatre. Since 1985, Tennessee Repertory Theatre has been a critically acclaimed regional theatre, creating the highest quality professional productions and serving as a prime cultural, educational and economic resource within Nashville and Middle Tennessee. The organization produces work that is designed, built and rehearsed in Nashville by highly skilled actors, designers, directors and technicians.
 
 
February 25
Educator Workshop: To See as Artists See: American Art from the Phillips Collection
Fee
 
To See as Artists See: American Art from The Phillips Collection provides an overview of the Phillips's renowned American collection by highlighting more than 100 paintings by 75 American artists. During this full-day workshop, educators examined original works of art on a curator-led tour, participated in studio activities and develop teaching ideas for the classroom. Educators received related resources and teaching materials including sample lesson plans and color art reproductions. Frist Center educator workshops are open to educators of all subjects, pre-K-12.
 
 
March 9
The Art of Songwriting: "American Songwriting in the Twentieth Century"
Presented by Michael Lasser
Free Book signing followed ecture.
 
Michael Lasser explored the art of songwriting and the way in which songwriters in the first half of the twentieth century created the American popular song through the use of African-American rhythms, European melody and American speech. Representing this diversity through song, Tin Pan Alley (the collection of New York City music publishers and songwriters who dominated the popular music of the United States in the late nineteenth and early twentieth century) was quick and shrewd in response to what was going on in the world around them. Their goal was to write hit songs that would appeal to as broad a public as possible. They weren't poets seeking to express a personal vision of the world but songwriters who were trying to express what they saw and heard within the firm conventions and limits of a popular song. A good song encapsulated a public attitude, belief, value, opinion or dream in 32 bars that, for a month or two anyway, people couldn't get out of their heads.
 
Following the lecture, Lasser was in the Frist Center Gift Shop to sign copies of his book American Songs: Stories Behind the Songs of Broadway, Hollywood, and Tin Pan Alley, which is co-written with Phil Furia. The book explores how creative skills and artistry work together to create lasting songs and invites readers to look behind the popular songs of the last century in order to understand how songwriters and musicians blend words and music with sentiment and melody.
 
About Michael Lasse: Raised in New Jersey in the shadow of Broadway, Michael Lasser is a nationally known lecturer, writer, broadcaster, critic and teacher.
 
The songs featured in American Songs: Stories Behind the Songs of Broadway, Hollywood, and Tin Pan Alley, are the basis for his nationally syndicated public radio program, Fascinatin' Rhythm, winner of a 1994 Peabody Award. A graduate of Dartmouth College, he is the former theater critic for The Rochester Democrat & Chronicle, and for 30 years has spoken at museums and universities around the country. In 2010, he was named a Thomas P. Johnson Distinguished Visiting Scholar at Rollins College. He is currently preparing a 2-CD set of the early songs of Irving Berlin and is working on a new book, The Song Is Us: Love, Lyrics & American Life, 1900­1950.
 
 
April 15
Free Family Day Festival at the Frist
1:00-5:30 p.m.
Free
 
Enjoy a day of discovery and creativity, filled with art activities, live music and exciting demonstrations. Bring your family and friends to share in a day filled with art and imagination! Exhibitions highlighted during the free day include To See as Artists See: American Art from The Phillips Collection; Fairy Tales, Monsters, and the Genetic Imagination; and Answers to Questions: John Wood and Paul Harrison.
 
(Information based on this article's March 12, 2012 publication date)
 

(above: Hassam, Childe, Washington Arch, Spring, 1890, Oil on canvas, 26 1/8 x 21 5/8 inches; 66.3575 x 54.9275 cm. Acquired 1921. The Phillips Collection, Washington, DC)

 

(above: Avery, Milton, Girl Writing, 1941, Oil on canvas, 48 x 31 3/4 inches; 121.92 x 80.645 cm. Acquired 1943. The Phillips Collection, Washington, DC)


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