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History Refused to Die - Alabama's African-American Self-Taught Artists in Context

March 14 - May 31, 2015

 

"History Refused to Die - Alabama's African-American Self-Taught Artists in Context" is on display at the Montgomery Museum of Fine Arts from March 14 through May 31, 2015.

In commemoration of the fiftieth-anniversary of the Selma-to-Montgomery March, the Museum will present this collection of works by a group of Alabama's most important self-taught artists who were active in the latter part of the twentieth century. These artists -- Thornton Dial and the Dial Family, Lonnie Holley, Joe Minter, and others -- responded to the cultural and social environment of their times through their art. Using found objects as well as traditional art materials, they created works of great power that speak to the roles of Black people throughout their history in the state, from slavery to the Civil Rights Movement.

The exhibition is organized by the Montgomery Museum of Fine Arts and the Centre for Living Arts in Mobile in conjunction with the Souls Grown Deep Foundation and Tinwood, Inc. in Atlanta, Georgia.

To view introductory wall panel text, please click here.

To view other wall panel texts, please click here.

To view extended labels for the exhibition please click here.

 

(above: Lonnie Holley (American, born 1950), Changing My Walk (Honoring Andrew Young), 2003, Chair and leather shoes. Montgomery Museum of Fine Arts, Montgomery, Alabama; Collection of William Arnett)

 

(above left: Thornton Dial (American, born 1928), History Lesson Survivors (1), 2007, Wood, corrugated tin, cloth, and enamel on wood. Montgomery Museum of Fine Arts, Montgomery, Alabama; William S. Arnett Collection of the Souls Grown Deep Foundation)

(above right: Thornton Dial (American, born 1928), History Lesson Survivors (2), 2007, Wood, corrugated tin, cloth, and enamel on wood. Montgomery Museum of Fine Arts, Montgomery, Alabama; William S. Arnett Collection of the Souls Grown Deep Foundation)

 

(above: Joe Minter (American, born 1943), '63 Foot Soldiers, 1999, License plates, shoes, found toys, metal grate, paint, plastic, and clothes. Montgomery Museum of Fine Arts, Montgomery, Alabama; Collection of William Arnett)

 

 

To view additional images of objects in the exhibition, please click here.


Resource Library editor's notes:

For definitions of wall panels and extended object labels, please see Definitions in Museums Explained.

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For biographical information on artists referenced in this article please see America's Distinguished Artists, a national registry of historic artists

Read more information, articles and essays concerning this institutional source by visiting the sub-index page for the Montgomery Museum of Fine Arts in Resource Library.


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