Editor's note: The Washington County Museum of Fine Arts provided source material to Resource Library for the following article. If you have questions or comments regarding the source material, please contact the Washington County Museum of Fine Arts directly through either this phone number or web address:



 

Ian Hornak: Transparent Barricades

June 1 - October 13, 2013

  

While I know that the beautiful, the spiritual and the sublime are today suspect,
I have begun to stop resisting the constant urge to deny that beauty has a valid right to
exist in contemporary art.
 
- Ian Hornak, from a 1994 interview with Cover Magazine
 
 

 

This retrospective exhibition of the artist Ian Hornak (1944 - 2002) is made possible through the efforts of the Ian Hornak Foundation, multiple public and private collections, and the Washington County Museum of Fine Arts. 

Hornak's artistic talent was visible at an early age. His earliest works show influences of the high renaissance masters, such as Leonardo and Michelangelo, whose drawings and paintings he saw in a book about the Old Masters given to him by his mother. The technical skills he learned from emulating the masters work is visible in Hornak's art throughout his career. 

Hornak's realism was counter to the abstract expressionist movement popular in the 1960s, but he resisted pressure from teachers and other artists to work in a non-representational style. He continued in the realist tradition even after moving to New York City in 1968 where he became close friends with some of the leading abstract and pop artists, Willem de Kooning, Robert Indiana, Andy Warhol, and Robert Motherwell. 

One of Hornak's signature styles was the technique of transposing multiple photographs of a landscape into one painting. Using photographs he took during his travels as inspiration, Hornak layered the images to create multiple exposure landscape paintings. The resulting paintings display both surrealism and romanticism and brought critical acclaim to the artist in the 1970s. 

In the mid-1980s, Hornak began adding "painted frames" -- flat, wood borders that he would use to expand the imagery of the canvas. He used these painted frames in his landscapes and to create a different type of multiple exposure painting. Hornak, also employed "painted frames" when he began experimenting with still life painting in the late-1980s. His still lifes show a reverence for Flemish and Dutch masters and portray a keen sense of design and openness to vibrant color. 

Hornak continued to paint and create new, imaginative works until his untimely death in 2002 at the age of fifty-eight. Today, he is recognized as one of the founding artists of the hyperrealist movement and his work is included in many public and private collections.  

This retrospective exhibition of the artist Ian Hornak (1944 - 2002) is made possible through the efforts of the Ian Hornak Foundation, multiple public and private collections, and the Washington County Museum of Fine Arts.

 

(above: View of Ian Hornak works on display in a gallery at Washington County Museum of Fine Arts. Photo courtesy Washington County Museum of Fine Arts)

 

(above: Ian Hornak, For Mahler #1, 1972, Acrylic on canvas. Collection of the Washington County Museum of Fine Arts, museum purchase, 1972)

 

 Exhibition List

Hanna Tillich's Mirror: Rembrandt's "Three Trees" Transformed into the Expulsion from Eden, 1978
Acrylic on canvas
Private collection 
 
 
Persephone Leaving, Variation III, 1977
Acrylic on canvas
Courtesy Xerox, Inc. 
 
 
Childhood of Hephaestus, 1977
Acrylic on canvas
Courtesy Xerox, Inc.
  
 
Domain of Asmodeus, 1985
Acrylic on panel with artist-painted frame
Private Collection 
 
 
Parrot Tulips with Red Macaw, 1986
Acrylic on canvas
Private collection 
 
 
Carnival Evening, 1985
Acrylic on canvas with painted wood border
Private collection
 
 
Song of Zephyrus, Variation II, 1979
Acrylic on canvas
Private collection
 
 
Still Life with Basket of Pears and Paco the Parrot, 1989
Acrylic on panel
Private collection 
 
 
Georgica Pond at Sunset, 1973
Acrylic on canvas
Private collection 
 
 
Looking Toward Oyster Pond, Montauk, 1983
Acrylic on canvas
Private collection
  
 
Blind Orion and Sunrise, 1974
Acrylic on canvas
AT&T Collection 
 
 
Home of the South Wind, 1979
Acrylic on canvas
Private collection 
 
 
Beim Schlafengehen, 1974
Acrylic on canvas
AT&T Collection 
 
 
Cattleya Mossiae Reineckiana, 1979
Acrylic on canvas
Private collection
 
 
Baroque Flower Piece with Moonrise, 2000
Oil on panel
Private collection
  
 
Still Life with Lobster, Helicona, and Silver Pitcher, 1998
Oil on panel
Private collection 
 
 
Transparent Barridcades, Variation III, 1974
Pencil on paper
Private collection 
 
 
Bulrushes in Winter, 1972
Acrylic on canvas
Private collection 
 
 
For Mahler #1, 1972
Acrylic on canvas
Collection of the Washington County Museum of Fine Arts, museum purchase, 1972 
 
 
Asmodeus, 1985
Acrylic on panel with artist painted frame
Private collection 
 
 
Self Portrait, 1957
Oil on panel
Private collection 
 
 
Self Portrait, 1957
Oil on panel
Private collection 
 
  
Self Portrait, 1957
Oil on panel
Private collection 
 
 
Self Portrait, 1957
Oil on panel
Private collection 
 
 
Self Portrait, 1957
Oil on panel
Private collection
 

 

 

Resource Library editor's note

RL readers may also enjoy:

For biographical information on artists referenced in this article please see America's Distinguished Artists, a national registry of historic artists

Read more articles and essays concerning this institutional source by visiting the sub-index page for the Washington County Museum of Fine Arts in Resource Library.


Search Resource Library for thousands of articles and essays on American art.

Copyright 2013 Traditional Fine Arts Organization, Inc., an Arizona nonprofit corporation. All rights reserved.